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Is versioning applicable to private assemblies?

Posted By :Subhransu Sekhar Jena     Posted Date :October 30, 2014    Points :40   Category :.NET Framework 
Versioning concept is only applicable to global assembly cache (GAC) as private assembly lie in their individual folders.

You can also find related Interview Question to Is versioning applicable to private assemblies?  below: 

Is versioning applicable to private assemblies?

Versioning concept is only applicable to global assembly cache (GAC) as private assembly lie in their individual folders. (More...)

Is versioning applicable to private assemblies?

Versioning concept is only applicable to global assembly cache (GAC) as private assembly lie in
their individual folders. (More...)

Is versioning applicable to private assemblies?

No, versioning is not applicable to private assemblies as these assemblies reside in their individual folder.
Versioning is applicable only to globsl assebly cache (GAC), i.e only to Shared/Public assemblies (More...)

What are private assemblies and shared assemblies?

A private assembly is used only by a single application, and is stored in that application's install directory (or a subdirectory therein). A shared assembly is one that can be referenced by more than one application. In order to share an assembly, the assembly must be explicitly built for this purpose by giving it a cryptographically strong name (referred to as a shared name). By contrast, a private assembly name need only be unique within the application that uses it.
By making a distinction between private and shared assemblies, we introduce the notion of sharing as an explicit decision. Simply by deploying private assemblies to an application directory, you can guarantee that that application will run only with the bits it was built and deployed with. References to private assemblies will only be resolved locally to the private application directory.
There are several reasons you may elect to build and use shared assemblies, such as the ability to express version policy. The fact that shared assemblies have a cryptographically strong name means that only the author of the assembly has the key to produce a new version of that assembly. Thus, if you make a policy statement that says you want to accept a new version of an assembly, you can have some confidence that version updates will be controlled and verified by the author. Otherwise, you don't have to accept them.
For locally installed applications, a shared assembly is typically explicitly installed into the global assembly cache (a local cache of assemblies maintained by the .NET Framework). Key to the version management features of the .NET Framework is that downloaded code does not affect the execution of locally installed applications. Downloaded code is put in a special download cache and is not globally available on the machine even if some of the downloaded components are built as shared assemblies.
The classes that ship with the .NET Framework are all built as shared assemblies. (More...)

Does CLR impose a strict versioning policy for the private assembly?

Answer is No. Private assembly are used by the application in which they are deployed. To use private assembly in any application, one needs to deploy them in the application's directory. Versioning needs to done for shared assembly which are stored in GAC and used by multiple applications. (More...)

What are private and shared assemblies?

A private assembly resides within the directory of the application, it can be used only by the application.
A shared assebly is stored in the global assebly cache (GAC), which is the repository of asseblies maintained at runtime, a shared assembly can be referenced by more than one application. (More...)

Can you have two assemblies with the same name in GAC?

Yes you can have two or more assemblies having same name in GAC only when assemblies version no is different.As we know that all assemblies in .NET is having version no. (More...)

What is Satellite Assemblies in .NET?

Assemblies which contains culture information are known as satellite assemblies. Satellite assembly is used to get language specific resources for an application. (More...)

Where are shared assemblies stored in .NET?

Shared Assemblies are stored in Global Assembly Cache also known as GAC. (More...)

What is Private Constructor? and it's use? Can you create instance of a class which has Private Constructor?

When a class declares only private instance constructors, it is not possible for classes outside the program to derive from the class or to directly create instances of it. (Except Nested classes)
Make a constructor private if:

1) You want it to be available only to the class itself. For example, you might have a special constructor used only in the implementation of your class' Clone method.

2) You do not want instances of your component to be created. For example, you may have a class containing nothing but Shared utility functions, and no instance data. Creating instances of the class would waste memory. (More...)

How can I see what assemblies are installed in the global assembly cache?

The .NET Framework ships with a Windows shell extension for viewing the assembly cache. Navigating to % windir%\assembly with the Windows Explorer activates the viewer. (More...)

What are the Types of Assemblies?

One of the disadvantages of using Visual Studio.NET and the .NET framework to develop applications has been the lack of cross-platform support. Since the introduction of the .NET framework and common language run time a few years ago, there have been a few projects designed to bring the .NET framework to other platforms, including Linux and UNIX. The DotGNU project is touted as the "Free software alternative to .NET" and encompasses a number of projects, including DotGNU Portable .NET, which is designed to be used to compile and run C# and C applications on a multitude of platforms, including GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, Mac OS X, and Windows. One of the main features of the product is it's compatibility with EMCA standards for C# and the Common Language Infrastructure (CLI), as well as Microsoft's own CLI implementation in the .NET framework. The project chose to go with a "Virtual Machine" implementation, where bytecode is transformed into a simple instruction set which is then passed to a "Converted Virtual Machine", which then are executed through an interpreter. This approach is different to other open source .NET implementations, but provides more flexibility when porting the project to other platforms. At the core of the project is the runtime engine (ilrun) and compiler (cscc) with an implementation of System.Windows.Forms that make
developing for the platform easier, as it doesn't required translation through another toolkit or toolset. (More...)

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