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What is delay signing?

Posted By :Narayanan     Posted Date :July 26, 2012    Points :40   Category :.NET Framework 
Delay signing allows you to place a shared assembly in the GAC by signing the assembly with just the public key. This allows the assembly to be signed with the private key at a later stage, when the development process is complete and the component or assembly is ready to be deployed. This process enables developers to work with shared assemblies as if they were strongly named, and it secures the private key of the signature from being accessed at different stages of development.

You can also find related Interview Question to What is delay signing?  below: 

What is delay signing?

  
During development process we have to sign strong name with our application. But it is not good practice in the security point of view. For that, we can sign it later. It is called delay signing.
(More...)

What is Delay signing ?

  
During development process you will need strong name keys to be exposed to developer which
is not a good practice from security aspect point of view.In such situations you can assign the key
later on and during development you an use delay signing (More...)

What is Delay signing ?

  
To create a strong named assembly and want this assembly to be used by someone else, we partially build this assembly by provide a Public Key. We write this Public Key in the AssemblyInfo.vb OR .cs file. We also add an attribute by the named to the assembly info file. This makes it sure that when we build the assembly, It would be containing the information only about the public key before we deliver it to our client. This is a partial strong named assembly that we have created, and hence it is called Delayed Assembly. (More...)

If I want to build a shared assembly, does that require the overhead of signing and managing key pairs?

  
Building a shared assembly does involve working with cryptographic keys. Only the public key is strictly needed when the assembly is being built. Compilers targeting the .NET Framework provide command line options (or use custom attributes) for supplying the public key when building the assembly. It is common to keep a copy of a common public key in a source database and point build scripts to this key. Before the assembly is shipped, the assembly must be fully signed with the corresponding private key. This is done using an SDK tool called SN.exe (Strong Name).
Strong name signing does not involve certificates like Authenticode does. There are no third party organizations involved, no fees to pay, and no certificate chains. In addition, the overhead for verifying a strong name is much less than it is for Authenticode. However, strong names do not make any statements about trusting a particular publisher. Strong names allow you to ensure that the contents of a given assembly haven't been tampered with, and that the assembly loaded on your behalf at run time comes from the same publisher as the one you developed against. But it makes no statement about whether you can trust the identity of that publisher. (More...)

What is strong naming (signing) a WebPart assembly file mean?

  

Signing an assembly with a strong name (a.k.a strong naming) uses a cryptographic key pair that gives a unique identity to a component that is being built. This identity can then be referred throughout the rest of the environment. In order to install assemblies into the GAC, they must be strongly named. After signing, the binary will have a public key token identifier which can be use to register the component in various other places on the server.
(More...)

What is strong naming (signing) a WebPart assembly file mean?

  
Signing an assembly with a strong name (a.k.a strong naming) uses a cryptographic key pair that gives a unique identity to a component that is being built. This identity can then be referred throughout the rest of the environment. In order to install assemblies into the GAC, they must be strongly named. After signing, the binary will have a public key token identifier which can be use to register the component in various other places on the server. (More...)

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