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Describe the advantages of writing a managed code application instead of unmanaged one. What's involved in certain piece of code being managed?

Posted By :Muthu     Posted Date :November 02, 2010    Points :10   Category :.NET Framework 
"Advantage includes automatic garbage collection,memory management,security,type checking,versioning
Managed code is compiled for the .NET run-time environment. It runs in the Common Language Runtime (CLR), which is the heart of the .NET Framework. The CLR provides services such as security,
memory management, and cross-language integration. Managed applications written to take advantage of the features of the CLR perform more efficiently and safely, and take better advantage of developers existing expertise in languages that support the .NET Framework.
Unmanaged code includes all code written before the .NET Framework was introduced-this includes code written to use COM, native Win32, and Visual Basic 6. Because it does not run inside the .NET environment, unmanaged code cannot make use of any .NET managed facilities."


You can also find related Interview Question to Describe the advantages of writing a managed code application instead of unmanaged one. What''s involved in certain piece of code being managed?  below: 

What is the managed and unmanaged code in .net?

  
The .NET Framework provides a run-time environment called the Common Language Runtime, which manages the execution of code and provides services that make the development process easier. Compilers and tools expose the runtime's functionality and enable you to write code that benefits from this managed execution environment. Code that you develop with a language compiler that targets the runtime is called managed code; it benefits from features such as cross-language integration, cross-language exception handling, enhanced security, versioning and deployment support, a simplified model for component interaction, and debugging and profiling services. (More...)

What is Managed and UnManaged code/

  


Managed Code:

The code, which is developed in .NET framework, is known as managed code. This code is directly executed by
CLR with help of managed code execution. Any language that is written in .NET Framework is managed code.

Managed code uses CLR which in turns looks after your applications by managing memory, handling security,
allowing cross - language debugging, and so on.



Unmanaged Code

The code, which is developed outside .NET, Framework is known as unmanaged code.

Applications that do not run under the control of the CLR are said to be unmanaged, and certain languages
such as C++ can be used to write such applications, which, for example, access low - level functions of
the operating system. Background compatibility with code of VB, ASP and COM are examples of unmanaged code.

Unmanaged code can be unmanaged source code and unmanaged compile code.

Unmanaged code is executed with help of wrapper classes.

Wrapper classes are of two types: CCW (COM Callable Wrapper) and RCW (Runtime Callable Wrapper).

Wrapper is used to cover difference with the help of CCW and RCW.
(More...)

What are managed code and unmanaged code?

  
Code that runs under a "contract of cooperation" with the common language runtime. Managed code must supply the metadata necessary for the runtime to provide services such as memory management, cross-language integration, code access security, and automatic lifetime control of objects. All code based on Microsoft intermediate language (MSIL) executes as managed code.

Code that is created without regard for the conventions and requirements of the common language runtime. Unmanaged code executes in the common language runtime environment with minimal services (for example, no garbage collection, limited debugging, and so on).

(More...)

What is managed code and managed data?

  
Managed code is code that is written to target the services of the Common Language Runtime (see What is the Common Language Runtime?). In order to target these services, the code must provide a minimum level of information (metadata) to the runtime. All C#, Visual Basic.NET, and _JScript.NET code is managed by default. Visual Studio.NET C++ code is not managed by default, but the compiler can produce managed code by specifying a command-line switch (/CLR).
Closely related to managed code is managed data-data that is allocated and de-allocated by the Common Language Runtime's garbage collector. C#, Visual Basic, and _JScript.NET data is managed by default. C# data can, however, be marked as unmanaged through the use of special keywords. Visual Studio.NET C++ data is unmanaged by default (even when using the /CLR switch), but when using Managed Extensions for C++, a class can be marked as managed by using the __gc keyword. As the name suggests, this means that the memory for instances of the class is managed by the garbage collector. In addition, the class becomes a full participating member of the .NET Framework community, with the benefits and restrictions that brings. An example of a benefit is proper interoperability with classes written in other languages (for example, a managed C++ class can inherit from a Visual Basic class). An example of a restriction is that a managed class can only inherit from one base class. (More...)

What is a Managed Code?

  
Managed code runs inside the environment of CLR i.e. .NET runtime. In short all IL are managed code. But if you are using some third party software example VB6 or VC++ component they are unmanaged code as .NET runtime (CLR) does not have control over the source code execution of the language. (More...)

What is Managed code?

  
The code runs inside the environment of CLR is called Managed code. All Intermediate Language codes are managed code. (More...)

How do I run managed code in a process?

  
The first step in running managed code in a process is to get the CLR loaded and initialized using a CLR host. Typically, a host consists of both managed code and unmanaged code. The managed code which executes in the default domain is usually responsible for creating the application domains in which the user code exists. All CLR hosts must contain unmanaged code because execution must begin in unmanaged code. The .NET Frameworks provides a set of unmanaged APIs that the host can use to configure the CLR, load the CLR into a process, load the hosts managed code into the default domain, and transition from the unmanaged code to the managed code.
The second step in running managed code in a process is to create application domains in which the user code will execute. The creator of the application domain can specify criteria which control code isolation, security, and loading of assemblies.
The third step in running managed code in a process is to execute user code in one or more application domains created in the previous step. All code that is run in the CLR must be part of an assembly. There are three options for loading assemblies. First, precompiled assemblies can be loaded from disk. Second, precompiled assemblies can be loaded from an array of bytes. Third, assemblies can be built dynamically in an application domain using the BCL Reflection Emit APIs.
Note. For an application launched from the command-line, the shell host executes the steps described above on behalf of the user and hides the complexity from the user.
(More...)

What is a Managed Code?

  
Managed code runs inside the environment of CLR i.e. .NET runtime. In short all IL are managed
code. But if you are using some third party software example VB6 or VC++ component they are
unmanaged code as .NET runtime (CLR) does not have control over the source code execution
of the language. (More...)

Where does Managed Code run in .Net?

  
Managed code runs inside the environment of CLR (More...)

does .net Support only Managed Code?

  
No , .Net Support Managed Code and UnManaged Code (More...)

Describe the difference between inline and code behind - which is best in a loosely coupled solution

  
ASP.NET supports two modes of page development: Page logic code that is written inside runat="server"> blocks within an .aspx file and dynamically compiled the first time the page is requested on the server. Page logic code that is written within an external class that is compiled prior to deployment on a server and linked ""behind"" the .aspx file at run time. (More...)

Which code snippet determines whether the Silverlight application is running inside browser or OOB?

  
App.GetState()

System.Windows.Application.Current.IsRunningOutOfBrowser

System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.IsRunningOutOfBrowser

Silverlight.IsRunningOutOfBrowser
(More...)

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