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Does the .NET Framework have in-built support for serialization?

Posted By :Muthu     Posted Date :November 02, 2010    Points :10   Category :.NET Framework 
There are two separate mechanisms provided by the .NET class library - XmlSerializer and SoapFormatter/BinaryFormatter. Microsoft uses XmlSerializer for Web Services, and uses SoapFormatter/BinaryFormatter for remoting. Both are available for use in your own code.

You can also find related Interview Question to Does the .NET Framework have in-built support for serialization?  below: 

Does the .NET Framework have in-built support for serialization?

  
There are two separate mechanisms provided by the .NET class library - XmlSerializer and SoapFormatter/BinaryFormatter. Microsoft uses XmlSerializer for Web Services, and uses SoapFormatter/BinaryFormatter for remoting. Both are available for use in your own code (More...)

What programming languages will the .NET Framework support?

  
The .NET Framework is language neutral; virtually any language can target the .NET Framework. Currently, you can build .NET programs in a number of languages, including C++, Microsoft® Visual Basic.NET, _JScript®, and Microsoft's newest language-C#. A large number of third-party languages will also be available for building .NET Framework applications. These languages include COBOL, Eiffel, Perl, Python, Smalltalk, and others. (More...)

What programming languages will the .NET Framework support?

  
The .NET Framework is language neutral; virtually any language can target the .NET Framework. Currently, you can build .NET programs in a number of languages, including C++, Microsoft® Visual Basic.NET, _JScript®, and Microsoft''s newest language-C#. A large number of third-party languages will also be available for building .NET Framework applications. These languages include COBOL, Eiffel, Perl, Python, Smalltalk, and others. (More...)

Can I customise the serialization process in .NET Framework

  
Yes. XmlSerializer supports a range of attributes that can be used to configure serialization for a particular class. For example, a field or property can be marked with the [XmlIgnore] attribute to exclude it from serialization. Another example is the [XmlElement]
attribute, which can be used to specify the XML element name to be used for a particular property or field.
Serialization via SoapFormatter/BinaryFormatter can also be controlled to some extent by attributes. For example, the [NonSerialized] attribute is the equivalent of XmlSerializer's [XmlIgnore] attribute. Ultimate control of the serialization process can be acheived by implementing the the ISerializable interface on the class whose instances are to be serialized.
(More...)

What is .NET Framework?

  
The .NET Framework has two main components: the common language runtime and the .NET Framework class library.
You can think of the runtime as an agent that manages code at execution time, providing core services such as memory management, thread management, and remoting, while also enforcing strict type safety and other forms of code accuracy that ensure security and robustness.
The class library, is a comprehensive, object-oriented collection of reusable types that you can use to develop applications ranging from traditional command-line or graphical user interface (GUI) applications to applications based on the latest innovations provided by ASP.NET, such as Web Forms and XML Web services. (More...)

What is serialization in .NET? What are the ways to control serialization?

  
Serialization is the process of converting an object into a stream of bytes. Deserialization is the opposite process of creating an object from a stream of bytes. Serialization/Deserialization is mostly used to transport objects (e.g. during remoting), or to persist objects (e.g. to a file or database).Serialization can be defined as the process of storing the state of an object to a storage medium. During this process, the public and private fields of the object and the name of the class, including the assembly containing the class, are converted to a stream of bytes, which is then written to a data stream. When the object is subsequently deserialized, an exact clone of the original object is created.
Binary serialization preserves type fidelity, which is useful for preserving the state of an object between different invocations of an application. For example, you can share an object between different applications by serializing it to the clipboard. You can serialize an object to a stream, disk, memory, over the network, and so forth. Remoting uses serialization to pass objects "by value" from one computer or application domain to another.
XML serialization serializes only public properties and fields and does not preserve type fidelity. This is useful when you want to provide or consume data without restricting the application that uses the data. Because XML is an open standard, it is an attractive choice for sharing data across the Web. SOAP is an open standard, which makes it an attractive choice.

There are two separate mechanisms provided by the .NET class library -
XmlSerializer and SoapFormatter/BinaryFormatter. Microsoft uses XmlSerializer for Web Services, and uses

SoapFormatter/BinaryFormatter for remoting. Both are available for use in your own code. (More...)

Does C# support multiple inheritance?

  
No

C# does not support multiple inheritance. A class can inherit from maximum one base class, although it can implement any number of interfaces. Like Java, C# does not support multiple inheritance, meaning that classes cannot inherit from more than one class (More...)

What is the .NET Framework?

  
The .NET Framework is an environment for building, deploying, and running Web Services and other applications. It consists of three main parts: the Common Language Runtime, the Framework classes, and ASP.NET. (More...)

Does the .NET Framework only apply to people building Web sites?

  
The .NET Framework enables you to create great Web applications. However, it can also help you build the same applications you build today. If you write any Windows software (using ATL/COM, MFC, Microsoft® Visual Basic®, or even standard Microsoft® Win32®), .NET offers many advantages to the way you currently build applications. Of course, if you do develop Web sites, then the .NET Framework has a lot to interest you-starting with ASP.NET. (More...)

What is the relationship between the .NET Framework and COM+ Services?

  
The .NET Framework gives you full access to COM+ services, while also making it easier to build serviced components.
.NET Framework components can be added to a COM+ application. There they can take advantage of automatic component services such as transactions, object pooling, queued components, events, and so on. (More...)

What is the relationship between the .NET Framework and DCOM?

  
DCOM is the COM infrastructure for cross-process communication. The .NET Framework supports a number of pluggable channels and formatters for cross-process communication. When making transitions between managed and unmanaged code, the .NET Framework uses the COM infrastructure, specifically, DCOM. All scenarios using COM+ services use managed-to-unmanaged transitions, and thus use DCOM by default. The .NET Framework also supports SOAP, the Simple Object Access Protocol, for cross-process communication where interoperability is critical. (More...)

Is the .NET Framework just a new name for Windows DNA?

  
No. Windows DNA is architecture for building tightly-coupled, distributed Web applications. As the needs of distributed applications changed to require more loosely-coupled principles, Microsoft evolved the architecture to .NET. The .NET Framework is a part of the .NET architecture. (More...)

What is the relationship between the .NET Framework and COM+ Services?

  
The .NET Framework gives you full access to COM+ services, while also making it easier to build serviced components.
.NET Framework components can be added to a COM+ application. There they can take advantage of automatic component services such as transactions, object pooling, queued components, events, and so on. (More...)

Can I use COM objects from a .NET Framework program?

  
Yes.

Any COM component you have deployed today can be used from managed code, and in common cases the adaptation is totally automatic.
Specifically, COM components are accessed from the .NET Framework by use of a runtime callable wrapper (RCW). This wrapper turns the COM interfaces exposed by the COM component into .NET Framework-compatible interfaces. For OLE automation interfaces, the RCW can be generated automatically from a type library. For non-OLE automation interfaces, a developer may write a custom RCW and manually map the types exposed by the COM interface to .NET Framework-compatible types.


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