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Bad Format when writing rejected rows to flat files when developing in Windows 7 64 bit

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 31, 2010    Points: 0   Category :Sql Server
Our SSIS 2008 developers recently moved from Windows XP 32 bit PC's to Windows 7 64 bit PC's.   Our test and production execution environments are Windows Server 2008 32 bit servers.  We have existing jobs that write rejected rows from FACT loads to a flat files, these flat files are then emailed to business users so they can clean up data in the source systems.  We ahve modified a few of these jobs since the developers have move to Windows 7 64bit for development.  When we run the jobs from BIDS on the Windows 7 64bit machines the flat files look as we would expect.  When migrate them to test or production and run them the flat file is in the format below.  I have read some articles that states the <none> in the Text Qualifier property of the flat file definition is causing the problem, but  I don't think that is true.  I have removed the <none> and se the text quailfier to '  or "  and there is still garbage in the output file.  If I use a single quote as the Text Qulaifier the string _x0027_EmployeeFirstName_x0027_ is put in the flat file. Thanks in advanced for any suggestions.  Run from BIDS on Windows 7 64 bit EmployeeFirstName,EmployeeLastName,ActivityDate,FacilityID,Facility Name FIRST,LAST,2010-07-10,48,FACILITY Run on Windows 2008 32 bit _x003C_none_x003E_EmployeeFirstN

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