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how to move SSAS applications between windows servers

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 28, 2010    Points: 0   Category :Sql Server
Hi All, We have separate windows servers hosting production and development environments.  Each environment consists of MS SQL Server and SSAS, studios, etc.  What would be the best way to move MS SQL Server databases and SSAS objects from one server to another?  I have been looking for some import/export applications but have not been able to find anything. Thanks for any help, Thanks, Roscoe

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