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Capture .NET Remoting Calls

Posted By:      Posted Date: May 22, 2011    Points: 0   Category :WPF


We have a client server application that 650 users are using everyday. Lately they have started complaining about over all slow responses and slowdowns in normal application usage like searching, reporting etc.

We are using .NET Framework 3.5 and .NET Remoting is the technology we have used for client connection to the server side. We can't remove that and use something else due to legacy application maintenance. We are using SQL 2008 R2 x64 on a very good server.

We have gone though the basic steps of making sure that all the SQL side is ok everything is well tuned but we need to convenience the client that it is not the application but the database that needs to be regularly maintained by a DBA in order for it to run smooth due to the nature of the application making tons of changes and inserts in the database everyday.

Anyways I need to write some sort of module that can plugin into the .NET Remoting calls so it can log the normal usage of different methods on the server like;

* How many times a remoting method is called

* What params a remoting method is called with

* How much time it takes to execute each remoting call

Is there anything available in .NET Framework that can help me? I read something about .NET Remoting Sync but not too sure if that is what I need to use? If any can shed any light on the subjec

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