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Which is more secure? ClientActivated / ServerActivated Remoting ?

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 28, 2010    Points: 0   Category :.NET Framework
Hi, I want to develop a client server model where multiple clients will be passing some data to a single server. I am using .Net remoting to acheive this. I was wondering which RemotingConfiguration should I go for (ClientActivated / ServerActivated)? Please help me analyse this. Thanks, Piyush Kumat

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