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What is the most efficient way to transmit XML messages in WCF?

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 27, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net
 

Hi Folks,

What is the most efficient way to transmit messages in WCF?
I've done a few basic walkthroughs of WCF and upon analyzing the XML transmission I saw that they were very large by default. Containing what appears to me, as a lot of unnecessary information, for my needs.

I'm looking for a way to send the shortest messages possible.
How can I trim as much as possible from the XML?
Can I remove all the header information...

What approach to you suggest for sending the shortest messages possible using XML in WCF?


Regards,
Andy




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