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CRUD Operation should be Part of BO or Service/Manager Classes?

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 27, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net


I am developing an application which has a general structure similar to what Scott has described at http://nhibernateasp.codeplex.com

Thanks to Scott for developing such a nice architecture which can be used for most of the projects!

It uses Service Layer which contains service classes (like Product Service) which actually talk to the repository layer (ProductRepository) and these service classes are responsible for CRUD operations while the BO (Product) contains just the data and the validation methods.

As I have read, in OO design, you should design a class which contain both data and behavior, in which case, the BO (Product) should be responsible for doing its own CRUD and it should not be a responsibility of Service classes.

Which approach you think is better design and what could be the reasons?

Any help is this regard is appreiciated.




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