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Cafe management

Posted By:      Posted Date: October 22, 2010    Points: 0   Category :.NET Framework


I want to develop a Internet Cafe management system in C#, in which there should be a server running and whenever a client login it should be displayed in the server and the duration and pay amount should be calculated automatically. There should be two way communication. Can any one tell a god link or sanple code to start with...

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