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Maximum size of a WriteableBitmap (System.Windows.Media.Imaging.WritableBitmap)

Posted By:      Posted Date: October 14, 2010    Points: 0   Category :WPF
I'm trying to find out the size limits on the WPF WritableBitmap class (ie. System.Windows.Media.Imaging.WritableBitmap, not the Silverlight class with the same name).
In the help for the BitmapSource base class it says:
"The maximum height and width of an image is 2^16 pixels at 32 bits per channel * 4 channels. The maximum size of a BitmapSource is 2^32 bytes (64 gigabytes) and the maximum image size is four gigapixels."
1. By my calculation, 2^32 bytes is 4 Gigabytes, not 64 Gigabytes. So is the size limit 2^32 (4 Gigabytes) or 64 Gigabytes (2^36)? 
2. Are the limits different on 32 and 64 bit versions of the OS?
3. Do these size limits also apply to the derived WriteableBitmap class, or are there further constraints based on available / addressable system memory and/or video (texture) memory?
Thanks in adva

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