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Locating SQL Backup Diagnostic Messages

Posted By:      Posted Date: October 13, 2010    Points: 0   Category :Sql Server

I'm having some problems tracking down backup errors using SQL Server 2008 (10.0.2531) in a Windows Server 2008 SP2 (32 bit) environment.

I get the following messages in the SQL Server log: "BACKUP failed to complete the command BACKUP DATABASE FapClaim. Check the backup application log for detailed messages." and "Error: 3041, Severity: 16, State: 1."

Searching on the code 3041, I get the advice to look at prior error messages.  There are none.  Checking the documentation, I can find no reference to the backup application log.

When I go to the Windows Application Event Log, I get essentially the same information:  "Event 3041 MSSQLSERVER"; "BACKUP failed to complete the command BACKUP DATABASE FapClaim. Check the backup application log for detailed messages."

Finally, when I open the Backup and Restore Events standard report for the database, I get the message: "No backup operations errors occured for [FapClaim] database in the recent past, or default trace is enabled."  To check this, I forced a bakcup failure on a database and cheked its report only to get the same entry for its database.

But when I query

SELECT [value] FROM sys.configurations WHERE [name]='default trace enabled'

I get 1.

What should my next step be? 

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