.NET Tutorials, Forums, Interview Questions And Answers
Welcome :Guest
Sign In
Win Surprise Gifts!!!

Top 5 Contributors of the Month
Gaurav Pal
Post New Web Links

Frontpage extensions and IIS 7.5?

Posted By:      Posted Date: October 07, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

I'm connecting remotely to my workstation and it's a Win 2008 R2 server. The FPE 2002 used to work on Win 2008 before we upgraded, but no longer work. I have a solution file that i need to open and it requires FPE to be installed. 

How do I go about doing this now? I can't just open the website, I need to open the solution. Thanks.

View Complete Post

More Related Resource Links

Configuring WS2003 x64 for Frontpage Server Extensions and ASP.NET 2.0

Hi there.  I'm having a really hard time configuring my server so I can create ASP.NET apps on it using Visual Studio 2005.  This is blocking an important project in my group.   Server is running Windows Server 2003 Standard x64 Edition.  We have a business need for this to be a 64-bit OS. Server has IIS 6 and ASP.NET 2.0 installed.  I can verify that ASP.NET 2.0 is working properly. Development takes place on a separate computer running Vista x64 and Visual Studio 2005.   The problem occurs when I attempt to create a web project in VS05 against the server.  I get the message "The server does not appear to have FrontPage Server Extensions installed."  Okay, I download and install the FrontPage Server Extensions x64 from Microsoft's website, but I still get the same error message.  I am also unable to configure the extensions on this server - I get internal server errors when I try to configure, or I get the message "Service Unavailable".   If I configure the server to run web apps in 32-bit mode, ASP.NET complains that it can't start due to the server configuration, and starting an ASP.NET project in VS returns the message "The server returned a message that FrontPage could not parse."  (Trying to publish a precompiled website from my dev machine returns the message "Service unavailable".)   There does not appear to be a way to get ASP

OneNote 2010: Creating OneNote 2010 Extensions with the OneNote Object Model


Learn how to build applications and plug-ins that interoperate with data from OneNote 2007 and 2010 using the OneNote Object Model library freely available on CodePlex. Andy Gray demonstrates how easy it is to integrate information from OneNote notebooks, sections and pages into smart client and Web apps.

Andy Gray

MSDN Magazine July 2010

Visual Studio OBA Tools: Simplify OBA Development With Interop API Extensions


To introduce you to VSTO Power Tools Office interop API extensions, we'll walk through the development of an application that automates Outlook, Excel, and Word.

Andrew Whitechapel, Phillip Hoff, and Vladimir Morozov

MSDN Magazine December 2008

Basic Instincts: My Namespace Extensions with My Extensibility


In this month's column, learn how to integrate your own My Namespace extension into the Visual Basic development environment using the My Extensibility feature.

Matthew DeVore

MSDN Magazine April 2008

Extreme ASP.NET: Client-Side Web Service Calls with AJAX Extensions


Microsoft AJAX Library and the ASP.NET 2.0 AJAX Extensions provide a number of compelling features ranging from client-side data binding, to DHTML animations and behaviors. Learn all about them here.

Fritz Onion

MSDN Magazine January 2007

C++ at Work: Persisting View State Update, Using Managed Extensions in a DLL


This month marks the 11th anniversary of my column and the inauguration of a new title: C++ At Work. We're also adding a new bimonthly column, "Pure C++," by my pal Stan Lippman, one of the great C++ Masters.

Paul DiLascia

MSDN Magazine February 2005

C++ Q&A: Performance Monitoring, Managed Extensions, and Lock Toolbars


In the June 2004 issue of MSDN®Magazine, I described a class called ShowTime that you can use to do simple performance monitoring for your app. ShowTime uses its constructor/destructor to record the start/stop times of its existence so you can instantiate it in a block of code like so: { ShowTime st(_T("Total time is:")); // some lengthy operation } .

Paul DiLascia

MSDN Magazine September 2004

Windows Shell: Create Namespace Extensions for Windows Explorer with the .NET Framework


Extending the Windows shell with namespace extensions allows you to create some custom functionality for Windows Explorer. One common use is to enable Explorer to present a list of items that do not exist in one real folder, but actually reside in a number of places. The view on the folder makes it look like these items are in one place, so managing them becomes easier. This article illustrates the process of creating custom shell namespace extensions using C# and the .NET Framework. The author dispels some myths about the difficulty of writing such extensions, and shows that it is easier than it was before .NET. Along the way he outlines undocumented interfaces and describes advanced techniques for consuming them in .NET.

Dave Rensin

MSDN Magazine January 2004

Security Briefs: Exploring S4U Kerberos Extensions in Windows Server 2003


Building Web sites that provide services external to the corporate firewall is tricky. Usually it's not desirable to grant corporate domain accounts to external clients, and from a purely practical standpoint Kerberos does not work well over the Internet due to the typical configuration of client-side firewalls.

Keith Brown

MSDN Magazine April 2003

ISAPI Extensions: Creating a DLL to Enable HTTP-based File Uploads with IIS


The MIME-compliant content type, called multipart/form-data, makes writing HTML that uploads files almost trivial. On the server side though, ASP does not have a way to access data in the multipart/form-data format. The most flexible way to access the uploaded file is through a C++ ISAPI Extension DLL. This article describes a reusable ISAPI extension DLL that allows you to upload images and files without writing C++ code. It is coupled with a few COM components that make it readily reusable for ASP development. With .NET, this whole process is much easier, and this article shows preliminary code that uploads files using ASP.NET features.

Panos Kougiouris

MSDN Magazine October 2001

Visual Studio .NET: Managed Extensions Bring .NET CLR Support to C++


If you're a longtime C++ programmer, the thought of migrating to Visual Studio .NET might make you wary at first. However, a new feature of Visual C++, the managed extensions for C++, allows you to build apps with the .NET Framework. When you use managed C++, your code is handled by the common language runtime (CLR). This provides advanced features like garbage collection, interoperability, and more. This article explains why you'd want to use the managed extensions, how to use them, how to mix managed and unmanaged code, and how your managed code can interoperate with programs written in other languages.

Chris Sells

MSDN Magazine July 2001

FrontPage 2002: Build Database Connectivity and Office XP Collaboration Features Into Your Site


FrontPage 2002 is packed full of improvements and new features, and includes tighter integration with Microsoft Office. The result is that documents created in Word and Microsoft Excel drop right into your Web site. Tools such as the clipboard, context sensitive search, and advanced copy and paste features have been introduced. Improved views and editing features make content creation faster and easier. Enhanced publishing features give you finer control over what is published, and reports detail publishing and usage statistics. There are also many new wizards to help you fly through tasks such as database connection. This article looks at these and other important features you'll want to explore.

Marnie Hutcheson

MSDN Magazine June 2001

Bending Time with the Reactive Extensions


The latest releases of the Reactive Extensions for .Net include an abstract VirtualScheduler and a concrete implementation called TestScheduler.

So now it's possible test time dependent code without relying on the passage of time (or tide).

Here's a sample of code that would take 3 days to complete in the real

[Fact(Timeout = 1000)]
public void TestScheduler()
    List<long> actual = new List<long>();
    Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromDays(1), _testSched)
    Assert.Equal(new[] { 0L, 1, 2 }, actual.ToArray());

Notice that I didn't use a blocking call, such as


to obtain a the values from the interval. The TestScheduler runs on the current thread, and as a result blocking calls never complete.


Here's another example where we run for a specific duration. Usefull when testing Observables that never end

public void TestOneElementSlidingWindow()
    List<SlidingWindow<Timestamped<int>>> actual = new List<SlidingWindow<Timestamped<

Administration Extensions Resource Center | SharePoint 2010

Are you developing an extension to SharePoint administrative functions? Get guidance, including information about programmatic administration, extending Central Administration, and creating Windows PowerShell cmdlets.

VS2010 designer problems with custom markup extensions returning FontFamily

App.xaml: <Application x:Class="CustomMarkup.App"              xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"              xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"              xmlns:int="clr-namespace:CustomMarkup"              xmlns:ext="clr-namespace:ExternalMarkupExt;assembly=ExternalMarkupExt"              StartupUri="MainWindow.xaml">     <Application.Resources>         <Style x:Key="MyStyle">             <Setter                  Property="Control.FontFamily"                  Value="{ext:ExtMarkupExt {x:Static int:Resources.FONTFAMILY_NAME}}"/>         </Style>     </Application.Resources> </Application> MainWindow: <Window x:Class="CustomMarkup.MainWindow"         xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"         xmlns:x=&quo
ASP.NetWindows Application  .NET Framework  C#  VB.Net  ADO.Net  
Sql Server  SharePoint  Silverlight  Others  All   

Hall of Fame    Twitter   Terms of Service    Privacy Policy    Contact Us    Archives   Tell A Friend