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Windows 2000 UI Innovations: Enhance Your User's Experience with New Infotip and Icon Overlay Shell

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

Windows 2000 includes some helpful new UI features you can customize and implement in your own applications. In this article you'll see how to provide infotips for files, after making the appropriate registry entries. Then create a custom column handler extension, resulting in a new column for the Explorer's Details view. In order to further extend the shell, additional UI goodies will also be examined and implemented including: search handlers, cleanup handlers, folder customizations using property sheet handlers and icon overlays, and context menu shell extensions. All the code samples are rolled up into a handy package which we've named, by tradition, ShellToys.

Dino Esposito

MSDN Magazine March 2000

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