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Why it is said that .NET framework is an integral part of Windows ?

Posted By:      Posted Date: October 06, 2010    Points: 0   Category :.NET Framework
Hi, why it is said that .NET Framework is an Integral Part of Windows? When i install Windows (Windows XP) operating system, then in control panel i did'nt find in the list for .NET framework installed.But when i install VS, that installed .NET Framework, and then i can see it in my installed programe list. So, Operating system is still working fine without .NET framework, then why it's said that .NET Framework is an integral part of Windows ?

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