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Which Framework Should You Use?: Building ActiveX Controls with ATL and MFC

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

Currently MFC and ATL represent two frameworks targeted at different types of Windows-based development. MFC represents a simple and consistent means of creating standalone apps for Windows; ATL provides a framework to implement the boilerplate code necessary to create COM clients and servers. The two frameworks overlap in their usefulness for developing ActiveX controls. We'll take a look at both frameworks as they apply to creating ActiveX controls-highlighting strengths and weaknesses, and walking through the process of creating a control-so you can determine when you might want to use one framework or the other.

George Shepherd

MSDN Magazine April 2000

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