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Scripting Windows: Windows Management Instrumentation Provides a Powerful Tool for Managing Windows

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

The new Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) technology for Windows 2000, Windows NT 4.0, and Windows 98 provides powerful scripting technology that can be used to administrate Windows-based systems. With WMI, you can create scripts to simplify management of devices, user accounts, services, networking, and other aspects of your system. This piece will introduce you to WMI and the WMI Scripting Object Model, taking a look at the available objects, methods, and properties. Along the way, you'll see how these elements can be used to create system management scripts.

Alan Boshier

MSDN Magazine April 2000

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