.NET Tutorials, Forums, Interview Questions And Answers
Welcome :Guest
Sign In
Win Surprise Gifts!!!

Top 5 Contributors of the Month
Gaurav Pal
Post New Web Links

Windows 2000: Asynchronous Method Calls Eliminate the Wait for COM Clients and Servers

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

Windows 2000 is the first version of COM to support asynchronous method calls, which permit clients to make nonblocking calls to COM objects and objects to process incoming calls without blocking the calling threads. COM clients benefit from asynchronous method calls because they can continue working while waiting for outbound calls to return. Objects benefit because they can queue incoming calls and service them from a thread pool. Our SieveClient and SieveServer sample apps demonstrate how to create and use asynchronous clients and servers in COM-based distributed applications.

Jeff Prosise

MSDN Magazine April 2000

View Complete Post

More Related Resource Links

.NET Delegates: Making Asynchronous Method Calls in the .NET Environment


One of the many great features of the .NET Framework is that it has asynchronous infrastructure built in. In .NET you can call any method asynchronously by defining a delegate for the method and calling the delegate's asynchronous methods. This is beneficial to your application because when a synchronous call is made, the calling thread is blocked until the method completes whereas an asynchronous call is made on a different thread, and this allows the original thread to continue its work while the asynchronous call is in progress.This article explains delegates in .NET and how to use them to perform asynchronous calls, eliminating age-old threading problems.

Richard Grimes

MSDN Magazine August 2001

Windows with C++: Asynchronous WinHTTP.


This month's column explains how to use Windows HTTP Services, or WinHTTP, the new, powerful API for implementing HTTP clients.

Kenny Kerr

MSDN Magazine August 2008

Smart Clients: Build A Windows Forms Control To Consume And Render WSRP Portlets


Smart client apps use local resources, provide a rich client experience, and support intelligent install mechanisms. Web services offer powerful interoperability and integration features. Find out how to combine them to develop integrated apps that incorporate data from disconnected sources.

Carl Nolan

MSDN Magazine February 2006

Smart Clients: Craft A Rich UI For Your .NET App With Enhanced Windows Forms Support


The System.Windows.Forms namespace has increased by approximately 134 percent over the .NET Framework 1.1. There are 446 new public types; 113 existing types have been updated with new members and values; 218 types have been carried over from the original namespace. Read about it here.

Chris Sells and Michael Weinhardt

MSDN Magazine Visual Studio 2005 Guided Tour 2006

Windows 2000 Loader: What Goes On Inside Windows 2000: Solving the Mysteries of the Loader


DLLs are a cornerstone of the Windows operating system. Every day they quietly perform their magic, while programmers take them for granted. But for anyone who's ever stopped to think about how the DLLs on their system are loaded by the operating system, the whole process can seem like a great mystery. This article explores DLL loading and exposes what really goes on inside the Windows 2000 loader. Knowing how DLLs are loaded and where, and how the loader keeps track of them really comes in handy when debugging your applications. Here that process is explained in detail.

Russ Osterlund

MSDN Magazine March 2002

Fax Services: Send Any Printable File From Your Program in Windows 2000


All versions of Windows 2000 have fax services built in, so sending faxes manually is as easy as setting fax options from the control panel. Faxes can also be sent programmatically in Windows 2000 using either COM Automation or the standard C API. The example in this article uses COM Automation with Visual Basic and MFC to programmatically manage faxing. The objects used for fax transmission, such as the FaxServer and FaxDoc objects, as well as their properties and methods, are explained. Because faxing of files you can't print can be problematic, this process is explained. Finally, this article implements a fax routing extension-a plug-in that exports standard functions and implements routing methods for processing received faxes.

Marcin Kaluza

MSDN Magazine August 2001

COM+ and Windows 2000: Ten Tips and Tricks for Maximizing COM+ Performance


There are many tricks to getting the most out of COM+, and this article offers the author's top 10. The tips cover the importance of transaction processing, the use of the COM+ catalog, and the design of three-tier distributed systems. Writing components using the correct threading model, knowing when to use compensating transactions, and the importance of stress testing early in the process also make the list. Other indespensible suggestions emphasize the importance of recognizing where an object's state is located, choosing appropriate authentication levels for COM+ applications, using Queued Components correctly, and implementing object pooling.

David S. Platt

MSDN Magazine December 2000

Windows 2000 Registry: Latest Features and APIs Provide the Power to Customize and Extend Your Apps


The Windows registry as it is recognized today first appeared in Windows 95. Its introduction simplified the storage of initialization information and made that data more secure. This article covers the history of the registry, the form it took in the early days, and its current incarnation in Windows 2000. Practical tips for managing data in the registry are outlined, along with descriptions of special keys, functions, and file types. Manipulation of the registry to customize both application behavior and certain features in Windows is discussed. Also covered are future directions of the registry, including the use of XML to store registry information in a hierarchical fashion.

Dino Esposito

MSDN Magazine November 2000

The VTrace Tool: Building a System Tracer for Windows NT and Windows 2000


This article describes the techniques used to construct VTrace, a system tracer for Windows NT and Windows 2000. VTrace collects data about processes, threads, messages, disk operations, network operations, and devices. The technique uses a DLL loaded into the address space of every process to intercept Win32 system calls; establishes hook functions for Windows NT kernel system calls; modifies the context switch code in memory to log context switches; and uses device filters to log accesses to devices.

Jacob R. Lorch and Alan Jay Smith

MSDN Magazine October 2000

Marshalling Your Data: Efficient Data Transfer Techniques Using COM and Windows 2000


The way you choose to transfer data is vitally important in a distributed application. Windows 2000 provides several new features that allow you to transfer data more efficiently. Lightweight handlers allow you to write smart proxies that can cache results and perform buffered reads and writes, minimizing the number of network calls. Windows 2000 also allows you to use pipe interfaces to transfer large amounts of data efficiently through a read-ahead facility. This article illustrates several ways to improve data transfer in Windows 2000 using these new features. It also reports the results of transfer time tests and provides recommendations for transferred buffer sizes.

Richard Grimes

MSDN Magazine September 2000

Shelley Powers: Migrating Your ASP Apps from Windows NT 4.0 to Windows 2000


In order to take advantage of new features in Windows 2000 and IIS 5.0, you must first migrate your Windows NT 4.0-based ASP applications to Windows 2000. This article provides a multi-step migration plan. It discusses how to install and configure IIS 5.0, set up security, migrate MTS packages to COM+ applications, and handle differences in the ASP object models. Also included are guidelines for setting up Visual Basic and Visual C++ for development in Windows 2000 and information on what to expect when moving ASP components to the new OS.

Shelley Powers

MSDN Magazine August 2000

More Windows 2000 UI Goodies: Extending Explorer Views by Customizing Hypertext Template Files


The Web-style interface is the default Explorer folder view for the Desktop Update in Windows 2000. The Desktop Update uses HTML-based hypertext templates to create the Web view, and you can customize these templates to include your own views and commands. This article shows you how the Explorer Web view works and how to build your own custom templates for it. You'll see how to add a command prompt and task buttons to a new folder view using HTML, script, and ActiveX controls. The shell object model and thumbnail shell extensions are also examined, then used to build a simple icon viewer for Explorer.

Dino Esposito

MSDN Magazine June 2000

ASP.NetWindows Application  .NET Framework  C#  VB.Net  ADO.Net  
Sql Server  SharePoint  Silverlight  Others  All   

Hall of Fame    Twitter   Terms of Service    Privacy Policy    Contact Us    Archives   Tell A Friend