.NET Tutorials, Forums, Interview Questions And Answers
Welcome :Guest
Sign In
Win Surprise Gifts!!!

Top 5 Contributors of the Month
Gaurav Pal
Post New Web Links

Marshalling Your Data: Efficient Data Transfer Techniques Using COM and Windows 2000

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

The way you choose to transfer data is vitally important in a distributed application. Windows 2000 provides several new features that allow you to transfer data more efficiently. Lightweight handlers allow you to write smart proxies that can cache results and perform buffered reads and writes, minimizing the number of network calls. Windows 2000 also allows you to use pipe interfaces to transfer large amounts of data efficiently through a read-ahead facility. This article illustrates several ways to improve data transfer in Windows 2000 using these new features. It also reports the results of transfer time tests and provides recommendations for transferred buffer sizes.

Richard Grimes

MSDN Magazine September 2000

View Complete Post

More Related Resource Links

Using WCF unable to transfer bulk data in windows base application

Hi, I am testing bulk data transfer over WCF service and my project structure is as follows. Project Structure: 1> One Console application that have the WCF service reside of it. 2> One Class library that contain the interface and a class file that implement the interface. 3> Another Windows Application type project act as a client interface that call the service using proxy. Now the scenario I have is as follows: 1> Inside of the console application their is a module that have the (following server side code) .This service is hosted in the Console app programmatically (No config file). Server Code: Dim x As New NetTcpBinding(SecurityMode.None)         With x             .TransactionFlow = False             .TransferMode = TransferMode.Streamed             .MaxReceivedMessageSize = Integer.MaxValue             .CloseTimeout = New TimeSpan(0, 10000, 0)             .OpenTimeout = New TimeSpan(0, 10000, 0)             .ReceiveTimeout = New TimeSpan(0, 10000, 0)       &n

Using Conditional Split data Transfer in SSIS 2008

This article uses the Integration Services Conditional Split Data Transformation element to filter and transfer data from a set of flat text files to SQL Server database table. The concept can be easily extended to apply to any other source or destination such as Microsoft Excel. This scenario is useful in creating denormalized database tables in a reporting and analysis situation.

Data Points: Windows Azure Table Storage - Not Your Father's Database


Let go of your traditional relational database thinking if you want to understand how Windows Azure Table storage works, says Julie Lerman. Luckily for you, she's done the hard work to grasp the new concepts and help you get up to speed.

Julie Lerman

MSDN Magazine July 2010

Cloud Security: Crypto Services and Data Security in Windows Azure


Many early adopters cloud platforms have questions about security. We review some of the cryptography services and providers in Windows Azure along with some security implications for applications in the cloud.

Jonathan Wiggs

MSDN Magazine January 2010

Cutting Edge: Pros and Cons of Data Transfer Objects


After a brief refresher on procedural and object based patterns for organizing the business logic layer, the author focuses on data transfer objects and the impact they have on the development of the software project.

Dino Esposito

MSDN Magazine August 2009

Smart Storage: Protect Your Data Via Managed Code And The Windows Vista Smart Card APIs


Smart cards are a compelling alternative to the reliance on passwords, which are the weakest link in authentication systems. Get the Windows smart card programming basics here.

Dan Griffin

MSDN Magazine November 2006

Data Points: XML Features in SQL Server 2000


SQL ServerT 2000 includes several XML features that let you transform relational rowsets into hierarchical XML documents, read XML documents, and bulk load data via XML. For example, you can pass an XML document to a stored procedure, join the XML to some tables and return a rowset, or even modify data in the database.

John Papa

MSDN Magazine June 2005

Data Points: Efficient Coding With Strongly Typed DataSets


Someone once said to me that the hallmark of a good developer is the desire to spend time efficiently. Developers are continually pursuing ways to make coding easier and faster, and to reduce the number of errors.

John Papa

MSDN Magazine December 2004

Data Points: Techniques in Filling ADO.NET DataTables: Performing Your Own Analysis


How do you know which technique is best for retrieving data and populating a DataSet in ADO.NET?. Since the Microsoft .NET Framework offers so many choices on how to write the code, many developers are now taking a close look at the different options. See what they are.

John Papa

MSDN Magazine June 2003

Metadata: Create a Database Schema Repository with Meta Data Services in SQL Server 2000


SQL Server 2000 Meta Data Services is a repository technology that stores and manages metadata for SQL Server. Instead of building database schemas over and over, Meta Data Services allows you to freeze an entire schema for use in other projects. You can also use these schemas for training, testing, or debugging. In this article, the authors will review the various components of Meta Data Services and show how it can be programmed using a Visual Basic client, XML, and XSLT. They will also show you how to manage and manipulate your metadata by generating a simple database schema using a SQL Server repository.

Alok Mehta and Ricardo Rodriguez

MSDN Magazine May 2003

Data Points: Techniques for Managing Rowset Paging


There are a number of ways to handle paging in Web applications. This month I'll examine several paging techniques and weigh their pros and cons. John Papa discusses how to manage paging and caching issues through the lower tiers of an n-tiered architecture, including how to make SQL Server manage the paging on your app's behalf.

John Papa

MSDN Magazine May 2003

Web Farms: Use Data Caching Techniques to Boost Performance and Ensure Synchronization


Performance is an important concern for any application, but becomes critical when the app is a Web Service accessed by thousands of clients simultaneously. One hardware approach to distributing Web Services requests evenly is a Web farm consisting of multiple servers. Once on a Web farm, Web Service performance can be improved by using ADO.NET DataSet objects to cache frequently accessed data, reducing round-trips to the database. Here the author describes data caching in a Web farm environment and discusses how to avoid the cross-server synchronization problems inherent in this approach.

David Burgett

MSDN Magazine December 2002

Scripting SQL: VBScript Interfaces in SQL Server 2000 Let You Transform Data and Provide Reports to


Application service providers often must send information to clients automatically rather than on-demand. For example, a manufacturer may want to know each day how many of their products were sold by a retail chain. While SQL Server is ideal for maintaining this type of database, you have to write scripts to get the data out in a client-friendly format. Here you will see how you can use Data Transformation Services (DTS), a powerful tool in SQL Server, to automate the retrieval and formatting of data from SQL Server 2000 and make the process of pushing data to your users a lot easier.

Alok Mehta and Daniel Williams

MSDN Magazine August 2002

SQLXML 3.0: Build Data-Driven Web Services with Updated XML Support for SQL Server 2000


XML is becoming the ubiquitous data format on the Web, and XML support in SQL Server is evolving to meet the additional demand. Using XML, SOAP, HTTP, and SQL Server, you can now build powerful Web Services easily. To show just how simple it is with SQLXML 3.0, this article walks the reader through the process step by step, from setting up a virtual directory enabling data access via HTTP to executing queries and building Web Services. Finally, the author illustrates the creation of two Web Services clients-one with C# that works with the Microsoft .NET Framework and one with the SOAP Toolkit 2.0 for anyone still using earlier development tools.

Christian Thilmany

MSDN Magazine May 2002

SQL Server 2000 and XML: Developing XML-Enabled Data Solutions for the Web


Using XML for data access allows you to separate the data from the presentation, and promotes reuse, extensibility, and division of labor. XML also has a simplified data model, which promotes easier testing. This article presents and compares five data access approaches, using a variety of technologies including ASP and ADO, XSLT, and DirectXML. Once built, the solutions are compared on the basis of their speed and efficiency.

Scott Howlett and Darryl Jennings

MSDN Magazine January 2002

ASP.NetWindows Application  .NET Framework  C#  VB.Net  ADO.Net  
Sql Server  SharePoint  Silverlight  Others  All   

Hall of Fame    Twitter   Terms of Service    Privacy Policy    Contact Us    Archives   Tell A Friend