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The VTrace Tool: Building a System Tracer for Windows NT and Windows 2000

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

This article describes the techniques used to construct VTrace, a system tracer for Windows NT and Windows 2000. VTrace collects data about processes, threads, messages, disk operations, network operations, and devices. The technique uses a DLL loaded into the address space of every process to intercept Win32 system calls; establishes hook functions for Windows NT kernel system calls; modifies the context switch code in memory to log context switches; and uses device filters to log accesses to devices.

Jacob R. Lorch and Alan Jay Smith

MSDN Magazine October 2000

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