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Open a powerpoint presentation in a panel in windows forms

Posted By:      Posted Date: October 04, 2010    Points: 0   Category :Windows Application

Dear All,

I have a problem of opening a powerpoint presentation in my window form's panel! i don't want to display the  presentation on the whole screen instead in a panel or other window forms control.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanking You. 

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Scroll/Zoom Windows.Forms.Panel controls


Is there some "thumbnail" or other "easy" way to provide the ability to have a populated panel of UserControl derived objects and scrollbar "move" them and "middle mouse zoom" them on the Client area of the panel?

I am using net FrameWork 4.0  The documentation leaves a tantilizing trail and I sure it can be done, but I do not want to miss something so simple like using the Thumbnail/bitmap/Background properties or methods of the Panel control? 

Thanks Everyone



Cannot open windows .net form in powerpoint slide show window


We have successfully created .NET addin in PowerPoint. On the click of this addin, we have opened a .net Form where there are three buttons(say Login and etc). On the click of Login button, we opened Login form. This works perfectly in PowerPoint.  But when we have slide show window, on the click on Login button, Login form gets opened on main PowerPoint window, but not on SlideShow window. This works properly on winXP m/c. We are facing this issue on win7 m/c. Please help me.

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