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Continuous "CallCanceled" exceptions for WMI operations

Posted By:      Posted Date: October 03, 2010    Points: 0   Category :.NET Framework

I'm writing a tool that uses WMI to monitor remotely the activity of multiple Windows boxes. The problem is that under load (a lot of results) WMI gets into a state in which all WMI calls get aborted with "CallCanceled" from which it does not seem to recover.

Does anybody know what could cause these exceptions, "CallCanceled" is ambiguous and there are no other traces in the logs.  What are the WMI limits - like for example the max number of allowed active concurrent connections, active queries, data , etc. ?


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