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.NET CLR Profiling Services: Track Your Managed Components to Boost Application Performance

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

The Microsoft .NET platform provides you with a rich set of services for building profilers and application monitors for applications targeting the Common Language Runtime (CLR). These services expose runtime events that occur during the execution of a .NET application. They can be used to obtain information about managed code being executed under the runtime. This article describes the .NET CLR Profiling Services and shows how to use the services to build a simple profiler that will provide hot spot information for any .NET application. The sample profiler can easily be modified to suit other profiling and monitoring needs.

Anastasios Kasiolas

MSDN Magazine November 2001

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