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New Graphical Interface: Enhance Your Programs with New Windows XP Shell Features

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

The Windows XP shell introduces many new features that both users and developers are sure to welcome. The interface supports a number of styles that will be new to users, and it also supports customization of those styles through a new concept called themes. There are more shell registry settings available to the user and developer, a facility for customizing infotips, and infotip shell extensions. In addition, folder views can be customized. This article covers these shell changes and includes a discussion of a number of other Windows XP additions. These include fast user switching, which lets users log on and off quickly, and AutoPlay support for a variety of devices and file types not previously supported.

Dino Esposito

MSDN Magazine November 2001

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.NET classes that allow you interct with windows while running other programs?

Hi everyone, I was wondering which .NET classes could I use if I want my aplication to interact wih windows while windows is running other programs. For Instance: As Snagit works...If you are using IE and press the Print screen key,(and have Snagit installed and activated) automatically the Snagit editor opens  showing the Clipboard you'v just got for you to edit it. Thanks!
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