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Windows XP: Kernel Improvements Create a More Robust, Powerful, and Scalable OS

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

The Windows XP kernel includes a number of improvements over Windows 2000 that promote better scalability and overall performance. This article covers these changes and explains how they improve startup time, increase registry size limits, and promote more efficient disk partitioning. Windows XP provides support for 64-bit processors, which is covered here along with a discussion of how side-by-side assemblies end DLL Hell. Also new in the Windows XP kernel is a facility that will roll back driver installations to the Last Known Good state of the registry, making driver installation safer. Other topics include the new volume shadow copy facility, which provides for more accurate backups and improvements in remote debugging.

Mark Russinovich and David Solomon

MSDN Magazine December 2001

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How to create a windows mobile (Smart Device) .Cab installer

A Cab file is the default setup format for Windows CE and Windows Mobile devices (similar to windows .msi files). You probably already have installed several application using .cab files, and are familiar with the concept. One point which is often unknown is that .cab files are processed by wceloader.exe, and it can only install one .cab file at a time. That means we cannot have nested .cab files. It doesn't mean we cannot have .cab files contained by another .cab, but the contained .cab files will not be installed during the installation of the container .cab. We should install it manually after the container .cab file installation has been completed.

There are two ways to create a cabinet (.Cab) file. The traditional one, and the friendly VS Smart Device Cab project which doesn't require additional coding, but which also relies on the traditional one at low-level.

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