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Still in Love with C++: Modern Language Features Enhance the Visual C++ .NET Compiler

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

Programmers who have been using C++ for years are wondering where their language is headed with the advent of C# and Microsoft .NET. This article sketches a roadmap of C++ as it is used in the world of .NET. In .NET there are two approaches to C++ code: managed and unmanaged. Unmanaged code doesn't use the CLR, while managed code involves the use of Managed Extensions for C++. This discussion explains both approaches.

Stanley B. Lippman

MSDN Magazine February 2002

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