.NET Tutorials, Forums, Interview Questions And Answers
Welcome :Guest
Sign In
Win Surprise Gifts!!!

Top 5 Contributors of the Month
Gaurav Pal
Post New Web Links

Inside Windows: An In-Depth Look into the Win32 Portable Executable File Format, Part 2

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

The Win32 Portable Executable File Format (PE) was designed to be a standard executable format for use on all versions of the operating systems on all supported processors. Since its introduction, the PE format has undergone incremental changes, and the introduction of 64-bit Windows has required a few more. Part 1 of this series presented an overview and covered RVAs, the data directory, and the headers. This month in Part 2 the various sections of the executable are explored. The discussion includes the exports section, export forwarding, binding, and delayloading. The debug directory, thread local storage, and the resources sections are also covered.

Matt Pietrek

MSDN Magazine March 2002

View Complete Post

More Related Resource Links

Inside Windows: An In-Depth Look into the Win32 Portable Executable File Format


A good understanding of the Portable Executable (PE) file format leads to a good understanding of the operating system. If you know what's in your DLLs and EXEs, you'll be a more knowledgeable programmer. This article, the first of a two-part series, looks at the changes to the PE format that have occurred over the last few years, along with an overview of the format itself. After this update, the author discusses how the PE format fits into applications written for .NET, PE file sections, RVAs, the DataDirectory, and the importing of functions. An appendix includes lists of the relevant image header structures and their descriptions.

Matt Pietrek

MSDN Magazine February 2002

Upload a File to a SharePoint Document Library - Part I

The following helper class demonstrates a few techniques that allow documents to be uploaded to a SharePoint document library programmatically without using the API or a custom web service. You don't need to specify a document library name, and it will create any folders specified in the URL as required. File meta data will be updated if any properties are passed.

Event Tracing For Windows: Core Instrumentation Events in Windows 7, Part 2


In Part 2, the authors cover core OS Event Tracing for Windows (ETW) events as well as present simple scripts to demonstrate a few basic accounting techniques on some of the OS events introduced.

Alex Bendetov, Insung Park

MSDN Magazine October 2009

Inside Windows 7: MultiTouch Capabilities in Windows 7


This is Part 3 of a multipart article series on Windows 7. Part 3 covers the Windows 7 multitouch capabilities.

Yochay Kiriaty

MSDN Magazine August 2009

Inside Windows 7: Introducing The Taskbar APIs


This is Part 2 of a multipart article series on Windows 7. The focus of Part 2 is the Windows 7 taskbar.

Yochay Kiriaty & Sasha Goldshtein

MSDN Magazine July 2009

Inside Windows 7: Introducing Libraries


This is Part 1 of a multipart article series on Windows 7. This article is about the new user profile storage concept in Windows 7, called Libraries.

Yochay Kiriaty

MSDN Magazine June 2009

Toolbox: Easy File Backup, Exploring Files And Folders Inside Visual Studio, Multiple Monitor Softwa


If the responsibility for creating, managing, and executing routine backups is yours, these tools will make it easier. Also see how you can browse folders and files from inside Visual Studio.

Scott Mitchell

MSDN Magazine May 2009

Windows With C++: X64 Debugging With Pseudo Variables And Format Specifiers


This month we explain how pseudo variables and format specifiers provide a wealth of information for use in debugging.

Kenny Kerr

MSDN Magazine December 2008

Access Control: Understanding Windows File And Registry Permissions


Understanding the ACLs that govern permissions and rights before an operation is allowed to proceed is critical to enhancing security.

John R. Michener

MSDN Magazine November 2008

CLR Inside Out: Extend Windows Forms Apps Using System.AddIn


See how Windows Forms applications can be adapted to use the new .NET Add-in framework (System.AddIn) this month.

Mueez Siddiqui

MSDN Magazine July 2008

CLR Inside Out: Measure Early and Often for Performance, Part 2


In the second of a two-part series, Vance Morrison delves into the meaning of performance measurements, explaining what the numbers mean to you.

Vance Morrison

MSDN Magazine May 2008

CLR Inside Out: Measure Early and Often for Performance, Part 1


In this month's column, get the inside scoop on how to build performance into your apps from the start, rather than dealing with the fallout after you deploy them.

Vance Morrison

MSDN Magazine April 2008

CLR Inside Out: Windows Vista Globalization Features


Windows XP and the Microsoft .NET Framework both have APIs that support globalization. Windows VistaT will further extend globalization support by introducing several new features.

Shawn Steele

MSDN Magazine June 2006

Cutting Edge: Windows Workflow Foundation, Part 2


In last month's column, I presented a helpdesk workflow sample that focused on Windows® Forms client applications. This month I'll discuss ASP. NET workflow applications and the ability to expose a workflow as a Web service and invoke a Web service from a workflow.

Dino Esposito

MSDN Magazine April 2006

Web Parts: Use Windows SharePoint Services as a Platform for Building Collaborative Apps, Part 2


Microsoft Office SharePoint Portal Server 2003, which is part of the Office System, lets you create and manage virtual servers, site collections, sites, workspaces, and users. You can also use the Windows SharePoint Services object model to design and implement user-targeted applications. In the second part of a two part series, the authors take a look at the WSS and SPS object models, Web Part Page anatomy, creating and deploying Web Parts, and Web Part security. They also discuss Web Part infrastructure and how to create custom Web Parts.

Jason Masterman and Ted Pattison

MSDN Magazine August 2004

Resource File: Windows Media 9 Series Digital Rights Management


If you have an application that handles Windows Media content and you need an effective way to track content usage, Windows Media 9 Series now offers Digital Rights Management (DRM). It allows you to take advantage of the peer-to-peer distribution model and still redirect users back to your app once they have downloaded your content (prior to viewing).

MSDN Magazine May 2003

ASP.NetWindows Application  .NET Framework  C#  VB.Net  ADO.Net  
Sql Server  SharePoint  Silverlight  Others  All   

Hall of Fame    Twitter   Terms of Service    Privacy Policy    Contact Us    Archives   Tell A Friend