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Advanced Basics: Visual Studio .NET, Debugging .NET Applications, and More

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net
 

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Parallel Debugging: Debugging Task-Based Parallel Applications in Visual Studio 2010

  

In Visual C++ 10 and the Microsoft .NET Framework 4, Microsoft is introducing new libraries and runtimes to significantly ease the process of expressing parallelism in your code base, together with new tool support for performance analysis and debugging of parallel applications. In this article, you will learn about debugging support in Visual Studio 2010, much of which is focused on task-based programming models.

Stephen Toub, Daniel Moth

MSDN Magazine September 2009


HttpHandler works with Visual Studio Development Server debugging, but not otherwise

  

Hi all,

I'm new to HttpHandlers.  I am writing an HttpHandler that reads uploaded files directly from the request stream to provide progress that can be queried using an AJAX request.  For large files, this seems to be faster than having ASP.NET load the file contents into Request.Files and then streaming the file from there to wherever it goes (Linq to SQL into a VARBINARY column in an SQL Server database.)

My HttpHandler works perfectly when I'm debugging using the Visual Studio Development Server, but doesn't work otherwise.  The application pool for this application in IIS 7 is set to run in Classic Mode, and the Handler Mappings screen in IIS says that I must manage managed handlers in system.web/httpHandlers. 

I set up in my applications Web.config file.

<add verb="GET,POST" path="*.upload" type="Namespace.For.UploadHandler, AssemblyForUploadHandler"/>

It works great, so long as I don't debug with the "Use Local IIS Web server" option.

What else do I need to do to get this to work?

Thanks!


Basic Instincts: Multi-Targeting Visual Basic Applications in Visual Studio 2010

  

Visual Studio 2010 lets you create applications that target versions of the Microsoft .NET Framework from 2.0 to 4, and each step in between. We take a look at how multi-targeting works in Visual Studio today, and explain how you should approach multi-targeting in your projects.

Spotty Bowles

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Advanced Basics: Using RibbonX from Visual Basic

  

Ken Getz prepares Visual Basic developers to use RibbonX.

Ken Getz

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Add-In Power: Let Users Customize Your Apps With Visual Studio Tools For Applications

  

If you're looking to increase the usefulness of your applications by making them customizable, you'll want to read about these three technologies available from Microsoft.

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Advanced Basics: A Match-Making Game in Visual Basic

  

My four-year-old son has decided that he wants to be like his dad when he grows up. He is planning to work in my office, and write computer programs just like I do. But there is one problem-he thinks I write games.

Duncan Mackenzie

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Advanced Basics: Remembering User Information in Visual Basic .NET

  

Many applications need to store user-specific settings to be persisted between sessions. But how do you go about saving and restoring these settings in your Microsoft® . NET Framework-based application? It's not all that easy to find the correct answer.

Duncan Mackenzie

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Advanced Basics: Data Binding in Visual Basic .NET

  

Ken Spencer introduces data binding in Visual Basic .NET.

Ken Spencer

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Scripting and .NET: Visual Studio for Applications Provides Customized Scripting Facilities for Your

  

In the past, the Microsoft Active Scripting architecture has allowed you to make your applications extensible. But it came with some drawbacks. You couldn't call into DLLs; you had to use COM interfaces. The scripts were not compiled, so they ran more slowly than they otherwise might, and a number of objects had to ride along with the script. To solve these problems and make extensibility easier to attain, Visual Studio for Applications was introduced. Presented here is an introduction to VSA that covers language support, types, events, and much more.

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ATL Server and Visual Studio .NET: Developing High-Performance Web Applications Gets Easier

  

When developing high-performance applications for the Web, developers often must choose between performance and ease of development. With ATL Server, new with Visual Studio .NET, developers get the best of both worlds. ATL Server uses a tag replacement engine written in C++, provides a simple programming model, and promotes enhanced performance and easy debugging. This article presents an overview of the ATL Server architecture, then creates a basic ATL Server project. It then goes on to explain processing SRF files, HTTP streams, forms, cookies, and header files. Managing session state is also discussed, along with file uploads and performance monitoring.

Shaun McAravey and Ben Hickman

MSDN Magazine October 2000


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