.NET Tutorials, Forums, Interview Questions And Answers
Welcome :Guest
Sign In
Register
 
Win Surprise Gifts!!!
Congratulations!!!


Top 5 Contributors of the Month
Imran Ghani
Post New Web Links

COM+ 1.5: Discover Powerful Low-Level Programming in Windows XP with New COM+ APIs

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net
 

The new version of COM+ that ships as part of Windows XP includes APIs for low-level context programming. These functions allow you to create contexts that use COM+ runtime services, independent of objects and without registering anything in the COM+ Catalog. Designed for advanced COM+ developers who understand the COM+ context model, these APIs make it easy to integrate runtime services with code in nonstandard ways. This article explains how these low-level context APIs work, discusses when you'd want to use them, and provides a .NET-based wrapper to make it simpler to use the APIs from C#.

Craig Andera and Tim Ewald

MSDN Magazine April 2002




View Complete Post


More Related Resource Links

Windows Server 2003: Discover Improved System Info, New Kernel, Debugging, Security, and UI APIs

  

There's a lot to say about Windows Server 2003. First of all, it's the first operating system with built-in .NET Framework support, and it's the first 64-bit OS from Microsoft. But wait, there's more! There are lots of new features and APIs in this version as well. For instance, Windows Server 2003 features Hot Add Memory and a number of other arcane new tidbits. There are new APIs for handling threads, directories, and files, and new features like the low fragmentation heap for managing memory and system information. There's vectored exception handling and new UI APIs as well.OS internals expert Matt Pietrek takes a look at the additions he finds most interesting and useful so you'll have a good place to start when you dive into Windows Server 2003.

Matt Pietrek

MSDN Magazine June 2003


Inside Windows 7: Introducing The Taskbar APIs

  

This is Part 2 of a multipart article series on Windows 7. The focus of Part 2 is the Windows 7 taskbar.

Yochay Kiriaty & Sasha Goldshtein

MSDN Magazine July 2009


Smart Storage: Protect Your Data Via Managed Code And The Windows Vista Smart Card APIs

  

Smart cards are a compelling alternative to the reliance on passwords, which are the weakest link in authentication systems. Get the Windows smart card programming basics here.

Dan Griffin

MSDN Magazine November 2006


Distributed .NET: Learn The ABCs Of Programming Windows Communication Foundation

  

Windows Communication Foundation unifies the existing suite of .NET distributed technologies into a single programming model to improve the developer experience. This article introduces WCF so you'll be prepared to take advantage of all the new capabilities.

Aaron Skonnard

MSDN Magazine February 2006


Talking Windows: Exploring New Speech Recognition And Synthesis APIs In Windows Vista

  

Windows Vista includes a built-in speech recognition engine exposed through a number of new APIs that will let your users interact with your app using speech rather than a keyboard or mouse. Here Robert Brown explains speech recognition and introduces you to the APIs to use in your upcoming Windows Vista applications.

Robert Brown

MSDN Magazine January 2006


Debug: Detect and Plug GDI Leaks in Your Code with Two Powerful Tools for Windows XP

  

In a previous article, the author devised a simple method to detect Graphical Device Interface (GDI) objects that are not properly released by Win32-based applications on Windows 9x platforms. Because some newer versions of Windows require a slightly different approach to GDI leaks, the author has updated his techniques for those operating systems. He builds and explains two tools designed to detect and eradicate GDI leaks in applications running on Windows XP, Windows 2000, and Windows NT.

Christophe Nasarre

MSDN Magazine January 2003


Windows XP: Kernel Improvements Create a More Robust, Powerful, and Scalable OS

  

The Windows XP kernel includes a number of improvements over Windows 2000 that promote better scalability and overall performance. This article covers these changes and explains how they improve startup time, increase registry size limits, and promote more efficient disk partitioning. Windows XP provides support for 64-bit processors, which is covered here along with a discussion of how side-by-side assemblies end DLL Hell. Also new in the Windows XP kernel is a facility that will roll back driver installations to the Last Known Good state of the registry, making driver installation safer. Other topics include the new volume shadow copy facility, which provides for more accurate backups and improvements in remote debugging.

Mark Russinovich and David Solomon

MSDN Magazine December 2001


Windows Forms: A Modern-Day Programming Model for Writing GUI Applications

  

To write GUI applications for Microsoft .NET you'll use Windows Forms. Windows Forms are a new style of application built around classes in the .NET Framework class library's System.WinForms namespace. They have a programming model all their own that is cleaner, more robust, and more consistent than models based on the Win32 API or MFC, and they run in the managed environment of the .NET Common Language Runtime (CLR). This article details what Windows Forms are all about, from the programming model to Microsoft Intermediate Language and the JIT compiler. Two applications using forms, event handlers, anchors and persistence are built step by step.

Jeff Prosise

MSDN Magazine February 2001


Active Scripting APIs: Add Powerful Custom Debugging to Your Script-Hosting App

  

Active Scripting is a powerful tool for adding advanced features such as macro capabilities to custom applications. This creates a need for integrated debugging services for new features added with scripting. To address this need, Microsoft has provided a set of COM interfaces for developing debugging services from within the Active Scripting framework. This article illustrates how to use the debugging services published within the Active Scripting framework to create a full-featured script debugger that can provide a multitude of debugging actions including setting breakpoints, call stack viewing, variable browsing, immediate-window viewing, thread enumeration, and application enumeration.

Mike Pellegrino

MSDN Magazine December 2000


Windows 2000 Registry: Latest Features and APIs Provide the Power to Customize and Extend Your Apps

  

The Windows registry as it is recognized today first appeared in Windows 95. Its introduction simplified the storage of initialization information and made that data more secure. This article covers the history of the registry, the form it took in the early days, and its current incarnation in Windows 2000. Practical tips for managing data in the registry are outlined, along with descriptions of special keys, functions, and file types. Manipulation of the registry to customize both application behavior and certain features in Windows is discussed. Also covered are future directions of the registry, including the use of XML to store registry information in a hierarchical fashion.

Dino Esposito

MSDN Magazine November 2000


Scripting Windows: Windows Management Instrumentation Provides a Powerful Tool for Managing Windows

  

The new Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) technology for Windows 2000, Windows NT 4.0, and Windows 98 provides powerful scripting technology that can be used to administrate Windows-based systems. With WMI, you can create scripts to simplify management of devices, user accounts, services, networking, and other aspects of your system. This piece will introduce you to WMI and the WMI Scripting Object Model, taking a look at the available objects, methods, and properties. Along the way, you'll see how these elements can be used to create system management scripts.

Alan Boshier

MSDN Magazine April 2000


Setting trust level for windows.system.forms.browser control

  

Hi All,

I am using a browser control in my WPF application. The users of this application will be using this control for viewing content that could contain malicious scripts. I want to set the Trust Level so that none of the scripts should be executed. I have added the Attribute to the method that creates the Browser control. I dont think its working though. Any thoughts on how this can be done?

[

PermissionSet(SecurityAction.Assert, Name = "Nothing")]

 

public System.Windows.Forms.WebBrowser CreateBrowserControl(

Setting trust level for windows.system.forms.browser control

  

Hi All,

I am using a browser control in my WPF application. The users of this application will be using this control for viewing content that could contain malicious scripts. I want to set the Trust Level so that none of the scripts should be executed. I have added the Attribute to the method that creates the Browser control. I dont think its working though. Any thoughts on how this can be done?

[

PermissionSet ( SecurityAction .Assert, Name = "Nothing" )]

 

public System.Windows.Forms.

Setting trust level for windows.system.forms.browser control

  

Hi All,

I am using a browser control in my WPF application. The users of this application will be using this control for viewing content that could contain malicious scripts. I want to set the Trust Level so that none of the scripts should be executed. I have added the Attribute to the method that creates the Browser control. I dont think its working though. Any thoughts on how this can be done?

[

PermissionSet ( SecurityAction .Assert, Name = "Nothing" )]

 

public System.Windows.Forms.

Categories: 
ASP.NetWindows Application  .NET Framework  C#  VB.Net  ADO.Net  
Sql Server  SharePoint  Silverlight  Others  All   

Hall of Fame    Twitter   Terms of Service    Privacy Policy    Contact Us    Archives   Tell A Friend