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Windows XP: Escape from DLL Hell with Custom Debugging and Instrumentation Tools and Utilities, Part

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

Building on his article published in the June issue, which demonstrated several ways to get process and DLL-related information from APIs such as PSAPI, NTDLL, and TOOLHELP32, the author presents some unusual ways to get system-oriented info that you can easily integrate in your own toolkit. There are three tools included as samples: LoadLibrarySpy, which monitors an application and detects which DLLs are really loaded; WindowDump, which retrieves the content and a detailed description of any window; and FileUsage, which redirects console-mode applications to tell you which process is using any opened file.

Christophe Nasarre

MSDN Magazine August 2002

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