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Help with rich Autocomplete

Posted By:      Posted Date: September 29, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net
 

Hello all ! 

my first post.. and with a big problem... :D

Here s the thing: i have 3 tables: Customers, Products and Categories. What i need, is a search textbox that look for the input data on those tables. The autocomplete needs to bee looked like a table with 3 columns.. and if the users press in one preview result, it goes to a new page... that page depends on wich column the user has clicked.

for example: 

Text to search: "co"

autocomplete:  

COMPANIESPRODUCTSCATEGORIES
cokecognacsCATEGORIES
anyone Co.magico grazzinicommodities
compascountries

Thank you !




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