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.NET Remoting: Design and Develop Seamless Distributed Applications for the Common Language Runtime

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

Prior to the advent of .NET, DCOM was the underlying technology for remote communications between Windows-based applications. But DCOM is quirky to set up and configure and not as interoperable as it should be. In .NET, XML Web Services and .NET Remoting are a seamless and effective answer to the demand for tools to build distributed applications.This article provides a primer on .NET Remoting with insights into the internal plumbing. Important aspects of remoting, such as channels, object lifetime management, and clients for remote objects are discussed. In addition, some practical examples are provided.

Dino Esposito

MSDN Magazine October 2002

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More Related Resource Links

Microsoft .NET: Implement a Custom Common Language Runtime Host for Your Managed App


While most application developers may not need to write a custom host, understanding what is involved provides a great deal of insight into the architecture of the CLR. After covering how the CLR is started and loaded into a process, how to set the available configuration options, and how a host defines application domains, this article explains how to design a custom host. Important concepts include making the right decisions about the application domain boundaries for the host, configuring them correctly, loading and executing user code, and resolving references to assemblies. Setting security policy and unloading application domains as the application shuts down are also explained.

Steven Pratschner

MSDN Magazine March 2001

Security in .NET: Enforce Code Access Rights with the Common Language Runtime


Component-based software is vulnerable to attack. Large numbers of DLLs that are not tightly controlled are at the heart of the problem. Code access security in the Common Language Runtime of the Microsoft .NET Framework addresses this common security hole. In this model, the CLR acts as the traffic cop to assemblies, keeping track of where they came from and what security restraints should be placed on them. Another way the .NET Framework addresses security is by providing preexisting classes which have built-in security. These are the classes that are invoked in .NET when performing risky operations such as reading and writing files, displaying dialog boxes, and so on. Of course, if a component calls unmanaged code, it can bypass code access security measures. This article covers these and other security issues.

Keith Brown

MSDN Magazine February 2001

Common Language Runtime Debugging Services


Application has generated a exception that could not be handled.

Process id=0xb0c (2828), Thread id=0x910 (2320).

Click OK to terminate the application

Click CANCEL to debug the application.

Now ive dont all of that, when i click OK the message just disapears all the way, but when I click CANCEL a differnt message appears. It says,

No Debugger found.

Registered JIT debugger is not avilable. An attempt to launch a JIT debugger with the following command resulted in a error code of 0x2 (2). Please heck computer settings.

Cordbg.exe !a 0b0c

Click on retry to have the proess wait while attaching a debugger manually.

Click on Cancel to ab

Ajax toolkit error : System.InvalidProgramException: Common Language Runtime detected an invalid pro


I have website that uses .NET 3.5 and Ajax tool kit.  The strange thing is it works fine in two environments but it errors with the following error on production site:


Server Error in '/UPS' Application.

Common Language Runtime detected an invalid program.

Description: An unhandled exception occurred during the execution of the current web request. Please review the stack trace for more information about the error and where it originated in the code.

Exception Details: System.InvalidProgramException: Common Language Runtime detected an invalid program.

Source Error:

Line 13:     <aj:ComboBox ID="ComboBox1"  runat="server">
Line 14:     </aj:ComboBox>
Line 15:     <aj:MaskedEditExtender MaskType="Number" ID="MaskedEditExtender1" Mask="(###)" TargetControlID="txt1" runat="server">
Line 16:     </aj:MaskedEditExtender>
Line 17:   

Source File: d:\Search\UPS\TestAjax.aspx    Line: 15

Stack Trac

Common Language RunTime Debugging Service

     We have built application in C#. This exe works fine with small Reports. But failed and give following error message whenever we try to run a big reports/processes:

              ReportGenerator.exe Common Language Runtime Debugging Services
              Application has generated an exception that could not be handled.
              Process ID=0x14 (1300), Thread Id=0xe8(232)

               Click OK to terminate the application.
               Click CANCEL to debug the application.

Any help will be grate appriciated...


How to Localize Windows Forms and Change the Language at Runtime

Localization is the process of customizing your application to a particular language, culture or locale. Visual Studio provides support for localizing Windows Forms with much ease. In this article, we will see how to localize windows forms and give the user the ability to change to his preferred language at runtime.
When you run a localized application, the appearance is determined by two culture values. The UICulture property is used to specify which resource files will be loaded for the form. The Culture property, on the other hand, determines how strings such as dates, numerals, and currency amounts are formatted.
Let us see the steps required to create a localized form. You can then expand this example and adopt the same approach for the rest of the forms in your project

Toolbox: Managing in the Cloud, UX Design Patterns, Anders Hejlsberg's The C# Programming Language,


Now that you're even managing projects in the cloud, you'll need some tools to help. This month we illustrate one, discuss UX design patterns, a book by Anders Hejlsberg, and more.

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Cloud Computing: Building Distributed Applications With .NET Services


We show you how .NET Services within the Azure Services Platform makes it easy to bring workflow apps to the cloud.

Aaron Skonnard

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Editor's Note: Overcoming Language Barriers with Elegant Design


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Howard Dierking

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This column uses the .NET version of the Python programming languages IronPython to demonstrate the value of dynamic languages and the new Dynamic Language Runtime.

Bill Chiles

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Netting C++: The Design Space of the Common Type System


Stanley Lippman moves Text Query Language to the Microsoft .NET Framework using the C++/CLI language extensions in Visual C++ 2005.

Stanley B. Lippman

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Reflection: Dodge Common Performance Pitfalls to Craft Speedy Applications


With reflection in .NET, you can load types, understand their members, make decisions about them, and execute, all within the safety of the managed runtime. But to use this power wisely, it's important to understand the associated costs and pitfalls to keep performance impact at a minimum. This article explains how.

Joel Pobar

MSDN Magazine July 2005

Around the Horn: Engineer a Distributed System Using .NET Remoting for Process Intensive Analysis


Before the Microsoft .NET Framework, creating a distributed cluster of computers to perform scientific analysis was expensive in terms of hardware, programming and debugging time, and maintenance. You had to purchase expensive servers, spend time debugging network communication, design a distributed system completely different from a system deployed locally, and maintain a melting pot of error handling, data acquisition, networking, and analysis code. In this article, the author shows you how he was able to engineer a distributed computing system in C# to perform analysis of real-world data continuously acquired at high sampling rates, thanks to the .NET Framework.

Nate D'Anna

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Design Patterns: Simplify Distributed System Design Using the Command Pattern, MSMQ, and .NET


Service-oriented architecture is a great framework when you need to perform distributed computing tasks over the Internet. But when you want to perform processing inside your local network, a different solution may provide a better fit. That solution, based on the Command pattern, uses Windows services and Microsoft Message Queuing to implement a queued system that meets your needs better than a service-oriented solution. This article explains how to build it.

Brad King

MSDN Magazine September 2004

COM+ Integration: How .NET Enterprise Services Can Help You Build Distributed Applications


The .NET Common Language Runtime (CLR) is Microsoft's next-generation component technology. The CLR is a replacement for COM, but not for COM+. COM+, now called .NET Enterprise Services, is the Microsoft object runtime environment for scalable system development. This article explains how to implement and deploy COM+ configured classes using the CLR, how to access object context and call context, and the rules for managing context-relative object references. Also discussed are ways to manage precious resources such as data connections and pooled objects, and the relationship between COM+ and the new .NET remoting architecture.

Tim Ewald

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MSLU: Develop Unicode Applications for Windows 9x Platforms with the Microsoft Layer for Unicode


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Michael Kaplan and Cathy Wissink

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Web Security: Putting a Secure Front End on Your COM+ Distributed Applications


The Internet requires that developers provide a different security model for clients than is used on a closed network. Because it would be too resource-intensive for both the client and server to prove their identity to each other, you need to look at other ways to ensure secure communications. This article covers the options, from digital certificates to public and private key encryption to Secure Sockets Layer and Web certificates. The discussion covers the installation of certificates in Microsoft Internet Information Services along with other options specific to IIS. This article was adapted from Keith Brown's Programming Windows Security (Addison-Wesley), due out in July 2000.

Keith Brown

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