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Data Points: Exploring SQL Server Triggers: Part 2

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net
 

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Data Points: SQL Server Management Objects

  

SQL Server Management Objects offer developers a robust toolset for backing up and restoring databases, and issuing DDL commands, as John Papa explains.

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MSDN Magazine June 2007


Data Points: Disabling Constraints and Triggers

  

What to do when you need to disable triggers and constraints to perform data synchronization and other tasks with an offline database.

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Data Points: Report Controls in SQL Server 2005 Reporting Services

  

Reporting has always been one of the dark arts of development. The tools typically seem to do just enough to get you to a certain point, then leave you to find workarounds to solve more complex issues.

John Papa

MSDN Magazine July 2006


Data Points: Designing Reports with SQL Server Reporting Services 2005

  

Many applications require some degree of integration with a reporting tool. A good solution, SQL ServerT Reporting Services 2005, provides Web-based reports and can be integrated into both Windows® Forms and Web-based applications.

John Papa

MSDN Magazine June 2006


Data Points: SQL Server 2005 XML Support, Exception Handling, and More

  

SQL Server 2005 includes several important improvements to the Transact-SQL (T-SQL) language. One added feature is a new kind of trigger that fires when data definition language (DDL) statements run.

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Data Points: The Enterprise Library Data Access Application Block, Part 3

  

E nterprise applications can have a wide variety of data update requirements. Sometimes you need to save multiple rows of changes at once within a single transaction. Other times, the user must be allowed to enter multiple rows of data, send them to the database in a batch; and if a row or two fails, only the rows that succeeded should be committed and remain committed.

John Papa

MSDN Magazine October 2005


Data Points: The Enterprise Library Data Access Application Block, Part 2

  

Last month I explored the foundation of the Enterprise Library Data Access Application Block (DAAB) including how it all fits into an architecture (see Data Points: The Enterprise Library Data Access Application Block, Part 1).

John Papa

MSDN Magazine August 2005


Data Points: The Enterprise Library Data Access Application Block, Part 1

  

A solid data access later (DAL) can benefit an application by hiding redundant tasks, helping handle exceptions more gracefully, helping clean up resources more efficiently, and providing a layer of abstraction from the database.

John Papa

MSDN Magazine July 2005


Data Points: XML Features in SQL Server 2000

  

SQL ServerT 2000 includes several XML features that let you transform relational rowsets into hierarchical XML documents, read XML documents, and bulk load data via XML. For example, you can pass an XML document to a stored procedure, join the XML to some tables and return a rowset, or even modify data in the database.

John Papa

MSDN Magazine June 2005


Data Points: Handling Data Concurrency Using ADO.NET, Part 2

  

Enterprise development has been moving towards a discon-nected model in recent years and ADO. NET development is no exception. While the disconnected model of the ADO. NET DataSet offers great flexibility, that adaptability also means looser control over data updates than you get with a connected data access model.

John Papa

MSDN Magazine October 2004


Data Points: Migrating from ADO to ADO.NET, Part 2

  

As you move forward with your use of ADO. NET, you'll need to know how to approach situations that you previously learned to handle in ADO and now have to tackle with ADO. NET. Just as n-tiered solutions developed using Visual Basic®, C++, and ASP often rely on ADO for their data access needs, Windows® Forms, Web Forms, and Web services rely on ADO.

John Papa

MSDN Magazine August 2004


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