.NET Tutorials, Forums, Interview Questions And Answers
Welcome :Guest
Sign In
Win Surprise Gifts!!!

Top 5 Contributors of the Month
david stephan
Gaurav Pal
Post New Web Links

Windows Shell: Create Namespace Extensions for Windows Explorer with the .NET Framework

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

Extending the Windows shell with namespace extensions allows you to create some custom functionality for Windows Explorer. One common use is to enable Explorer to present a list of items that do not exist in one real folder, but actually reside in a number of places. The view on the folder makes it look like these items are in one place, so managing them becomes easier. This article illustrates the process of creating custom shell namespace extensions using C# and the .NET Framework. The author dispels some myths about the difficulty of writing such extensions, and shows that it is easier than it was before .NET. Along the way he outlines undocumented interfaces and describes advanced techniques for consuming them in .NET.

Dave Rensin

MSDN Magazine January 2004

View Complete Post

More Related Resource Links

Windows Forms: .NET Framework 1.1 Provides Expanded Namespace, Security, and Language Support for Yo


With the much-anticipated release of the .NET Framework 1.1, developers are eager to know what's been added to their programming bag of tricks. In this article, the author focuses on new developments in Windows Forms, such as namespace additions, support for hosting managed controls in unmanaged clients, and designer support for C++ and J#. Integrated access to the Compact Framework and new mobile code security settings also make this release noteworthy. Along with these features, the author reviews the best ways to handle multiple versions of the common language runtime and highlights some potential pitfalls.

Chris Sells

MSDN Magazine March 2003

How to create a windows mobile (Smart Device) .Cab installer

A Cab file is the default setup format for Windows CE and Windows Mobile devices (similar to windows .msi files). You probably already have installed several application using .cab files, and are familiar with the concept. One point which is often unknown is that .cab files are processed by wceloader.exe, and it can only install one .cab file at a time. That means we cannot have nested .cab files. It doesn't mean we cannot have .cab files contained by another .cab, but the contained .cab files will not be installed during the installation of the container .cab. We should install it manually after the container .cab file installation has been completed.

There are two ways to create a cabinet (.Cab) file. The traditional one, and the friendly VS Smart Device Cab project which doesn't require additional coding, but which also relies on the traditional one at low-level.

Desktop Security: Create Custom Login Experiences With Credential Providers For Windows Vista


Why is a change to the Windows logon plug-in interface so exciting? Because with credential providers you can customize the logon experience for your users.

Dan Griffin

MSDN Magazine January 2007

Safety in Windows: Manage Access to Windows Objects with ACLs and the .NET Framework


Until now, Microsoft did not provide explicit support in the .NET Framework for manipulating security settings. With the .NET Framework 1.x, access can only be granted to users via a series of cumbersome P/Invoke calls. By introducing the concepts of security objects and rules, the .NET Framework 2.0 allows developers to manipulate security settings of objects in a few easy steps using managed code. Want to know more? Read on.

Mark Novak

MSDN Magazine November 2004

.NET Framework 2.0: Craft a Rich UI for Your .NET App with Enhanced Windows Forms Support


The upcoming version of the .NET Framework offers a host of enhancements an order of magnitude over and above existing versions. In particular, developers writing Windows Forms benefit from a variety of new and improved features targeting development, deployment, increased productivity, and auto-generated code. This article covers some of the key new features including designer enhancements, new controls, data binding, and deployment to give you a taste of what's to come.

Michael Weinhardt and Chris Sells

MSDN Magazine May 2004

Mobility: Add Keyboard Support to Compact Framework Apps by Trapping Windows Messages


The Compact Framework Control class doesn't provide direct access to Windows messages. However, with P/Invoke, a few lines of native code, and the Compact Framework MessageWindow class, it's still possible to access underlying Windows messages. This can be used to work around any .NET Framework features, including keyboard support, that are not included in the Compact Framework.

Alan Pulliam

MSDN Magazine April 2004

Security Briefs: Exploring S4U Kerberos Extensions in Windows Server 2003


Building Web sites that provide services external to the corporate firewall is tricky. Usually it's not desirable to grant corporate domain accounts to external clients, and from a purely practical standpoint Kerberos does not work well over the Internet due to the typical configuration of client-side firewalls.

Keith Brown

MSDN Magazine April 2003

Printing: Preview and Print from Your Windows Forms App with the .NET Printing Namespace


Printing is an integral part of every complete Windows-based application. Providing robust printing capabilities in these applications has often proved to be a tedious chore. Now, printing from Windows Forms with the .NET Framework means you must adopt a document-centric approach, resulting in cleaner and more manageable code. While the System.Windows.Forms namespace provides seamless integration with all the standard print dialogs (such as Print Preview, Page Setup, and Print), the System.Drawing.Printing namespace offers numerous classes for extensibility and customization. These classes, and how they provide access to printing capabilities, are covered here. Other useful techniques, such as printing in the background to allow the user to continue other tasks, is also explained.

Alex Calvo

MSDN Magazine February 2003

Cutting Edge: Windows Hooks in the .NET Framework


If you wanted to, you could distinguish two general categories of classes in the Microsoft® . NET Framework-classes that introduce new functionality such as XML readers and ADO. NET providers, and collections and classes that wrap underlying Win32® system functions.

Dino Esposito

MSDN Magazine October 2002

DirectShow: Core Media Technology in Windows XP Empowers You to Create Custom Audio/Video Processing


DirectShow is an API that enables Windows applications to control a wide variety of audio/video input devices including (but not limited to) DV camcorders, Web cams, DVD drives, and TV tuner cards. It provides out-of-the-box support for a variety of formats, from WAV and AVI to Windows Media. DirectShow is also extensible, enabling third parties to support their own specialized devices, formats, or processing components. This article introduces the basic concepts behind DirectShow and gives a step-by-step tutorial showing how to create your own video effect filter.

Michael Blome and Mike Wasson

MSDN Magazine July 2002

.NET Zero Deployment: Security and Versioning Models in the Windows Forms Engine Help You Create and


Windows Forms applications solve many of the problems inherent in building Web applications the old fashioned way?with HTML. To demonstrate the use of Windows Forms over the Web, the author takes his existing app, Wahoo!, and ports it to Windows Forms. In doing so, he discusses versioning, linked files, security, storage isolation, the deployment model, and everything else you need to get started building your own Windows Forms apps for the Web.

Chris Sells

MSDN Magazine July 2002

Windows Forms: Developing Compelling User Controls that Target Forms in the .NET Framework


In the beginning, writing controls meant dealing with Windows messages. Then came Visual Basic controls, which introduced methods, properties, and events. Later, ActiveX controls, which ran atop COM, became popular. While each innovation in control writing brought more flexibility, nothing has matched the versatility of the new .NET Windows Forms controls and Web Forms controls. This article, the first of a two-part series, introduces the reader to Windows Forms, beginning with their inheritance from one of the .NET CLR base classes, which makes control creation much faster than before. Control programming is illustrated through the development of a login control. The equally flexible Web Forms controls will be covered in Part 2.

David S. Platt

MSDN Magazine April 2002

Windows CE: Develop Handheld Apps for the .NET Compact Framework with Visual Studio .NET


Smart Device Extensions (SDE) for Visual Studio .NET allow programmers to develop applications for the .NET Compact Framework, a new platform that maintains many of the features of the .NET Framework in a version optimized for handheld devices. This article shows how SDE provides access through Visual Studio .NET to a variety of .NET classes for devices running Windows CE, including classes for creating user interfaces. Data access classes and Web Services for the .NET Compact Framework are also explained. Following that overview, a sample Web Service called XMLList is built. Then the UI-the XMLList client-side application-is created.

Larry Roof

MSDN Magazine March 2002

Windows XP: Kernel Improvements Create a More Robust, Powerful, and Scalable OS


The Windows XP kernel includes a number of improvements over Windows 2000 that promote better scalability and overall performance. This article covers these changes and explains how they improve startup time, increase registry size limits, and promote more efficient disk partitioning. Windows XP provides support for 64-bit processors, which is covered here along with a discussion of how side-by-side assemblies end DLL Hell. Also new in the Windows XP kernel is a facility that will roll back driver installations to the Last Known Good state of the registry, making driver installation safer. Other topics include the new volume shadow copy facility, which provides for more accurate backups and improvements in remote debugging.

Mark Russinovich and David Solomon

MSDN Magazine December 2001

New Graphical Interface: Enhance Your Programs with New Windows XP Shell Features


The Windows XP shell introduces many new features that both users and developers are sure to welcome. The interface supports a number of styles that will be new to users, and it also supports customization of those styles through a new concept called themes. There are more shell registry settings available to the user and developer, a facility for customizing infotips, and infotip shell extensions. In addition, folder views can be customized. This article covers these shell changes and includes a discussion of a number of other Windows XP additions. These include fast user switching, which lets users log on and off quickly, and AutoPlay support for a variety of devices and file types not previously supported.

Dino Esposito

MSDN Magazine November 2001

Windows Management Instrumentation: Create WMI Providers to Notify Applications of System Events


Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) is based on an industry-wide standard for notifications used to manage objects and devices across a network. By receiving WMI events, an application can be notified of changes to data in WMI itself. This allows the developer to notify the consuming application that certain system configuration data has changed, without the application having to poll WMI continuously for this data. The author presents an explanation of the different types of events in WMI, then goes on to develop an event provider.

J. Andrew Schafer

MSDN Magazine September 2001

ASP.NetWindows Application  .NET Framework  C#  VB.Net  ADO.Net  
Sql Server  SharePoint  Silverlight  Others  All   

Hall of Fame    Twitter   Terms of Service    Privacy Policy    Contact Us    Archives   Tell A Friend