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Instrumentation: Powerful Instrumentation Options in .NET Let You Build Manageable Apps with Confide

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

As systems grow and become more heterogeneous, so their complexity increases. The more code you write, the more that can go wrong. The more that can go wrong, the more you need a good instrumentation policy. In this article, the author looks at the various technologies available in the .NET Framework, such as tracing, logging, WMI, EIF, which are designed to help you. He will also look at the pitfalls you should avoid and provide you with the fundamentals from both a technical and managerial perspective so that you can instrument your code effectively.

Jon Fancey

MSDN Magazine April 2004

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