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Prototype Pattern-Creational Patterns in C#

Posted By: Rahul     Posted Date: January 19, 2010    Points: 2   Category :Patten/Practices
The Prototype Pattern approaches the creation of the objects that our client will use by cloning instances from prototypes as required. This achieves the general aim of decoupling the client from the objects that it will use, but also adds some advantages unique to the Prototype pattern.

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Abstract Factory Pattern-Creational Patterns

The Factory pattern allowed us to decouple our client from an object which it uses. The Abstract Factory pattern extends this idea to manage separate families of objects.

A runtime selection, or configuration option, in our client could decide which family of objects is to be used. The Abstract Factory pattern allows us to write generic code to instantiate and use the family objects regardless of which family is chosen at runtime. The pattern also helps us enforce a rule where objects from just the chosen family are used uniformly by the client.

Singleton Pattern-Creational Patterns

The Singleton pattern is a specialist creational pattern as it's primary focus is to facilitate a single shared instance of our object rather than to decouple our client from the object's implementation as with the other creational patterns.

Prototype Design Pattern in C#. Vb.NET

Specify the kind of objects to create using a prototypical instance, and create new objects by copying this prototype

Prototype Patterns in C#

The PROTOTYPE PATTERN comes under the classification of Creational Patterns. The creational patterns deals with the best way to create objects. This helps to copy or clone the existing objects to create new ones rather than creating from the scratch.

GOF Creational Design Patterns with C#

The GOF design patterns help address the following challenges :

design ready to accommodate change & growth

design flexible systems which come ready to handle reconfiguration and run time tailoring

code in manner to facilitate reuse during the development and extension phases ... ie. both external and internal reuse, so that we are rewarded by efficiencies as the project progresses, coming from investments made earlier in the project.

implement change in a way that doesn't overly shorten the system's useful lifespan

Design Patterns - Using the State Pattern in C#

What is the State Pattern?

The State Pattern is a behavioral pattern that can be used to alter the behavior of an object at run time. As the state of an object changes, the functionality of the object can change drastically. This change of behavior is hidden from the Client and the Client interfaces with a wrapper object known as the Context. The State Pattern is a dynamic version of the Strategy Pattern.

Patterns in Practice: The Unit Of Work Pattern And Persistence Ignorance


Jeremy Miller continues his discussion of persistence patterns by reviewing the Unit of Work design pattern and examining the issues around persistence ignorance.

Jeremy Miller

MSDN Magazine June 2009

Patterns: WPF Apps With The Model-View-ViewModel Design Pattern


In this article we explain just how simple it can be to build a WPF application the right way using the MVVM Pattern.

Josh Smith

MSDN Magazine February 2009

Design Patterns: Simplify Distributed System Design Using the Command Pattern, MSMQ, and .NET


Service-oriented architecture is a great framework when you need to perform distributed computing tasks over the Internet. But when you want to perform processing inside your local network, a different solution may provide a better fit. That solution, based on the Command pattern, uses Windows services and Microsoft Message Queuing to implement a queued system that meets your needs better than a service-oriented solution. This article explains how to build it.

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Dialogs and ViewModel - Using Tasks as a Pattern

The ViewModel/MVVM pattern continues to gain popularity, with a blog post showing up every so often, and with tweets and retweets popping up even more often :-). At the same time, there are some interesting topics beyond the core pattern that continue to fuel experimentation. A big one amongst those is how should applications use dialogs when using the view model pattern.

The crux of the problem is the desire to keep the view model independent of UI concerns, and ensure it can be tested in a standalone manner, but that often comes to odds when you want the view model to launch a dialog, and/or do some work after the dialog is closed.

Adapter Design Pattern in C#, VB.NET

Convert the interface of a class into another interface clients expect. Adapter lets classes work together that couldn't otherwise because of incompatible interfaces.

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Ensure a class has only one instance and provide a global point of access to it.

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The job of the Factory design pattern is to create concrete sub classes. You can see the Factory design pattern used throughout the .NET Framework.

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Solidify Your C# Application Architecture with Design Patterns

design pattern can solve many problems by providing a framework for building an application. Design patterns, which make the design process cleaner and more efficient, are especially well-suited for use in C# development because it is an object-oriented language. Existing design patterns make good templates for your objects, allowing you to build software faster. This article describes several popular design patterns you can use in your own applications, including the singleton, the decorator, the composite, and the state classes, which can improve the extensibility of your applications and the reuse of your objects.
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