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Attack Surface: Mitigate Security Risks by Minimizing the Code You Expose to Untrusted Users

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

In this article, Microsoft security expert Michael Howard discusses the cardinal rules of attack surface reduction. His rules - reduce the amount of code executing by default, reduce the volume of code that is accessible to untrusted users by default, and limit the damage if the code is exploited - are explained along with the techniques to apply the rules to your code.

Michael Howard

MSDN Magazine November 2004

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Code to get how many users are logged in to the sharepoint site

How to get the users of my sharepoint who are online.....

Thanx in advance,

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