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C++ Rules: Power Your App with the Programming Model and Compiler Optimizations of Visual C++

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

Many programmers think that C++ gets good performance because it generates native code, but even if your code is completely managed you'll still get superior performance. In Visual Studio 2005, the C++ syntax itself has been greatly improved to make it faster to write. In addition, a flexible language framework is provided for interacting with the common language runtime (CLR) to write high-performance programs. Read about it here.

Kang Su Gatlin

MSDN Magazine January 2005

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Sharepoint 2010 power tools visual sandboxed web part issue!!


Hi guys

I tried to use a simple hello world web part with with sharepoint power tools the solution is added ok but when I try to add the web part to the page I get this error "Unable to load assembly group. The user assembly group provider...." Any thoughts






SharePoint 2010 Forum: Using Visual Studio with SharePoint and Other Programming

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Extracting Association Rules from Data Mining Model

Hi I have succesfully created a Data Mining Model using the Association Model. I have deployed and processed it. I need to extract all the rules that is generated by the model. I know that you normally query the model using DMX prediction queries, but in this case I need to extract the rules to a separate table for further processing. I have tried the following approaches unsuccessfully: 1. Linked server in MSSQL Management Studio. DMX query using OpenQuery. The DMX query looks like this: SELECT FLATTENED NODE_CAPTION, NODE_SUPPORT, NODE_PROBABILITY, MSOLAP_NODE_SCORE FROM DataMiningModel.CONTENT WHERE NODE_TYPE = 8   On small models this method works. On larger models with many rules I receive an exception: "XML for Analysis parser: The XML for Analysis request timed out" before it was completed This always happens after 70min. I might have missed a timeout option? 2. Using SSIS to run the same DMX query as above. The method is presented here: http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/MDX/64697/ This method works on small models. On larger models that did not work with method 1, it return rules. The number of rules returned is sometimes different for the same package run multiple times. For the largest models it simply returns 0 rules. I suspect that the same XML Parser error happens under the hood of SSIS. I'm currently stuck, and need some inp

Association rules dimension error caused by setting the model algorithm



I got this error meassage when I wanted to process a mined cube:

"Error (Data mining): An error occurred while the 'Bon_DMDim' data mining dimension with the 'Bon' source mining model was being processed. The algorithm of the source model returned data mining dimension content information that is not valid."

Before processing I modified only one algorithm parameter in the Association Mining model properties (AlgorithmParameters):

MINIMUM_SUPPORT = 10 (Default 0.0)

I need to have this adjustment for getting rules...

If I set back this field to 0 or empty, then the processing ends up with no error messages (and I would not have mined rules...).

I also get this message, if I use numbers between 0 and 1 (as a percentage).

How can I build a usable (but with adjusted algorithm parameter) mined dimension and apply it in an OLAP cube?

Thank you and BR,



Can I create an ADO.NET Entity Data Model for a MySQL database using Visual Web Express 2010?


Can I create  an  ADO.NET Entity Data Model for a MySQL database using Visual Web Express 2010?

If yes, are there any documentation or tutorials?


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