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High Availability: Keep Your Code Running with the Reliability Features of the .NET Framework

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

Reliability requires the capacity to execute a sequence of operations in a deterministic way, even under exceptional conditions. This allows you to ensure that resources are not leaked and that you can maintain state consistency without relying on application domain unloading (or worse, process restarts) to fix any corrupted state. Unfortunately, in the.NET Framework, not all exceptions are deterministic and synchronous, which makes it difficult to write code that is always deterministic in its ability to execute a predetermined sequence of operations. In this article Stephen Toub will show you why, and explore features of the .NET Framework 2.0 that help you to mitigate these situations and write more reliable code.

Stephen Toub

MSDN Magazine October 2005

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Custom Cultures: Extend Your Code's Global Reach With New Features In The .NET Framework 2.0


The upcoming Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 adds a number of globalization features that address the important issues of extensibility, standards support, and migration. Here authors Michael Kaplan and Cathy Wissink explain what these features mean to your globalization effort.

Michael Kaplan and Cathy Wissink

MSDN Magazine October 2005

Bar Code Scanners with the .NET Compact Framework

Summary: Learn how to make your applications use bar code scanners in a generic way-ndependent of the specific bar code scanners that are used on different devices. Using the design patterns Façade and Factory, the implementation not only supports multiple bar code scanners, but it also makes it easy to add support for other bar code scanners. After a brief discussion about bar code scanners and the bar code scanner pattern, a download code sample, written in C#, demonstrates the use of the pattern and technologies.

C# 4.0: New C# Features in the .NET Framework 4


The C# language has been improved over the years with numerous features that make common tasks involving generic types, legacy interop, and working with dynamic object models much simpler.

Chris Burrows

MSDN Magazine July 2010

Cloud Computing: Patterns For High Availability, Scalability, And Computing Power With Windows Azure


Here we examine the typical cloud platform architecture and some common architectural patterns, along with their implementation on the Windows Azure offering from Microsoft.

Joshy Joseph

MSDN Magazine May 2009

Wicked Code: Running ASMX Web Services on STA Threads


Jeff Prosise describes performance problems in an ASMX Web service that relied on legacy COM and Visual Basic 6.0 to perform key processing tasks and the approach he took to find a fix.

Jeff Prosise

MSDN Magazine October 2006

Are You in the Know?: Find Out What's New with Code Access Security in the .NET Framework 2.0


Unlike role-based security measures, code access security is not based on user identity. Instead, it is based on the identity of the code that is running, including information such as where the code came from. Here Mike Downen discusses the role of code access security (CAS) in .NET and outlines some key new features and changes in CAS for the .NET Framework 2.0.

Mike Downen

MSDN Magazine November 2005

Wicked Code: Five Undiscovered Features on ASP.NET 2.0


By now, developers everywhere have had the opportunity to download the first beta of the Microsoft® . NET Framework 2. 0. ASP. NET developers who have played with it are no doubt salivating at all the cool new features.

Jeff Prosise

MSDN Magazine February 2005

CLR Profiler: No Code Can Hide from the Profiling API in the .NET Framework 2.0


The common language runtime (CLR) profiling API makes available information about the application domains, assemblies, and classes that are loaded and used in a process, just-in-time (JIT) compiler notifications, memory usage tracking, tracing of events, exception tracking, managed to unmanaged code transitions, and the state of the runtime. And if that weren't enough, you will find a nicely enhanced profiling API in the .NET Framework 2.0. Find out what's coming up in this next version.

Jay Hilyard

MSDN Magazine January 2005

.NET Internals: Examine Running Processes Using Both Managed and Unmanaged Code


There are plenty of times when you need to get information on running processes, not the least of which is during performance tuning. Using the techniques in this article and special .NET classes you'll see how to get a process' ID, name, priority, number of threads, kernel handle, and memory consumption, as well as its user-mode, kernel-mode, and total elapsed running time and put them to use in a custom app called AssemblyBrowser.

Christophe Nasarre

MSDN Magazine October 2004

C++: Write Faster Code with the Modern Language Features of Visual C++ 2005


The next version of Visual C++ has a new syntax that is both elegant and powerful. It has new optimization technology that has improved the speed of Microsoft. It has new compilation modes that ensure Common Language Infrastructure compliance and verifiability for the .NET Framework, and it has new models for interop. In this article Stephen Toub explains these and other improvements to Visual C++.

Stephen Toub

MSDN Magazine May 2004

Code Name Indigo: A Guide to Developing and Running Connected Systems with Indigo


This article describes a collection of new programming frameworks that are part of "Longhorn," the upcoming version of Windows. "Indigo," the code name for this framework, provides rich support for service-oriented design that is complementary to traditional object-oriented approaches. Indigo marries the best features of .NET Remoting, ASMX, and .NET Enterprise Services into a unified programming and administration model. Indigo's deep support for standard protocols, including HTTP, XML, and SOAP, makes it easier to integrate applications and services without sacrificing security or reliability.

Don Box

MSDN Magazine January 2004

.NET Internals: Rewrite MSIL Code on the Fly with the .NET Framework Profiling API


In this article, the author shows how to dynamically rewrite Microsoft Intermediate Language code on the fly using the Profiling API of the CLR. Unlike approaches based on Reflection.Emit, this scheme works with the existing assemblies and doesn't require the creation of proxy or dynamic assemblies. The need for IL code rewriting emerges when you want to make your changes transparent to the client and preserve the identity of classes. This technique can be used for creation of interceptors, pre- and post-processing method calls, and code instrumentation and verification.

Aleksandr Mikunov

MSDN Magazine September 2003

Return of the Rich Client: Code Access Security and Distribution Features in .NET Enhance Client-Sid


Rich clients employ many of the features and conveniences of the operating system they run on, and the list of these features has been growing since the dawn of the PC. But as apps have migrated to the Web, the trend towards increasing client-side functionality has ground to a virtual halt. There are several reasons for this; chief among them are security and deployment problems. But that's all about to change. With the .NET Framework, you can participate in building the distributable rich client of the future. In this article, the author enumerates the pertinent features of .NET that will allow you to build safe, easily deployable controls. The features discussed include managed code, code access security, versioning control, Windows Forms classes, and isolation.

Jason Clark

MSDN Magazine June 2002

IIS 6.0: New Features Improve Your Web Server's Performance, Reliability, and Scalability


As the Web evolves, so does the role that Internet servers play. The Internet has seen the growth of e-commerce, B2B business, collaboration, streaming and other new media, and these new applications require new features to meet increasingly complex needs. Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) has many of the features today's mature Web sites need. This article outlines the features in the upcoming version 6.0 and discusses how they promote better scalability, reliability, and performance. Features such as Remote administration, caching, and metabase improvements, as well as custom isolation and security enhancements, make IIS 6.0 the Web server of the future.

George Shepherd

MSDN Magazine March 2002

C# and the Web: Writing a Web Client Application with Managed Code in the Microsoft .NET Framework


When the author wanted to build a middleware Web client to connect to other applications over the Internet, he realized that the XMLHttpRequest COM object was not sufficient for his purposes. In order to build a Web client using managed code, the author had to use the HTTPWebRequest and HTTPWebResponse classes provided by the Microsoft .NET framework. These classes are used in the sample project as a substitute for the less powerful XMLHttpRequest COM object, allowing the author to build a full-featured Web client. They also take advantage of all the benefits that the CLR and managed code have to offer.

Avi Ben-Menahem

MSDN Magazine September 2001

Windows Script Host: New Code-Signing Features Protect Against Malicious Scripts


Downloading scripts from the Web or e-mail leaves users vulnerable to security risks because scripts can't be signed. But now developers can use Windows Script Host (WSH) to hash scripts so users can verify their source and safety. With WSH, scripts can be signed or verified using all the same tools ordinarily used to sign EXE, CAB, DLL, and OCX files. This article discusses public-key cryptosystems, the process of signing and verifying scripts in WSH, and several warnings about attacks that could potentially be made against cryptographically secured scripts and ways in which to avoid them.

Eric Lippert

MSDN Magazine April 2001

The Weekly Source Code 56 - Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Training Kit - Code Contracts, P

Do you like a big pile of source code? Well, there is an imperial buttload of source in the Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Training Kit . It's actually a 178 meg download, which is insane. Perhaps start your download now and get it in the morning when you get up. It's extremely well put together and I say Kudos to the folks that did it. They are better people than I. I like to explore it while watching TV myself and found myself looking through tonight. I checked my blog and while I thought I'd shared this with you before, Dear Reader, I hadn't. My bad, because it's pure gold . With C# and VB, natch. Here's an outline of what's inside. I've heard of folks setting up lunch-time study groups and going through...(read more)
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