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UI on the Fly: Use the .NET Framework to Generate and Execute Custom Controls at Run Time

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

Creating UI controls on the fly can be accomplished via run-time code generation. And there are lots of reasons to do so. Generating these controls once and then reusing them as needed is more efficient than generating the controls each time. Read on.

Morgan Skinner

MSDN Magazine December 2005

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Custom panel - missing design time support for controls.

I’m trying to implement a custom panel, one that will behave kind of like the standard Canvas panel. The implementation is done and it is working when I add components in the xaml, but what is not working is move and resize of components in the designer. In the designer each component shows the ‘selected frame’ when selected, but it cannot be moved or resized. Can someone point me to what I’m missing, or an article that describes how do add this support?.   The reason I’m not deriving from the existing Canvas is mainly because I want to understand how it works and how to implement it manually.   Thanks  

Custom Controls in C# .NET

Embedding user controls in a Windows form is just like adding a simple button or text box that are already provided with .NET. These basic controls were written essentially like you code your own controls. Typically the controls you design are to be used in multiple forms or to modularize your code. These reasons help reduce the amount of code you have to type as well as make it easier for you to change your implementation. There should almost never be any reason to duplicate code because it leaves a lot of room for bugs. So, implementing functionality specific to your control in the control's source code is a good idea. This reduces code duplication as well as modularize your code, which is a good programming guideline.

How to programmatically add controls to Windows forms at run time by using Visual C#

Create a Windows Forms Application
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Custom Control Design-Time SiteMap Provider Error


Greetings - I was referred here by MSDN forums hope this is the right place -  

I have a custom control (:WebControl) that renders web.sitemap in a specific way. While it runs error free and produces the expected result, at Design-Time it complains

Error Creating Control - MyControl  The provider 'AspNetXmlSiteMapProvider' specified for the defaultProvider does not exist in the providers collection.

I have discovered that the error is cause by this line of code:

string div = string.Format("<div class='{0}' id='{1}'>{2}</div>", this.CssClass, this.ID.ToString(), EnumerateNodesRecursive(SiteMap.RootNode, level));

or more specifically, by the reference to SiteMap.RootNode - I am not clear what is missing thoough because I have configured the SiteMapProvider in web.config as this:

        <add name="AspNetXmlSiteMapProvider" 
             type="System.Web.XmlSiteMapProvider, System.Web, Version=2.0.3600.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a" 

ASP.NET Designer - How Do I generate this Design-Time Markup?


I want to generate this:
    <x:MyControl id="a" runat="server">
            <x:MyScript .. />

How do I persist custom complex types in design-time


Let's say that I've got one custom webcontrol called MyControl.

public partial class MyControl: WebControl {
public IComplex Complex { get; set; }

The control is a very simple control but it holds an instance of a complex type that is accessable through a property. The property has the propertytype IComplex

public interface IComplex {
string Name { get; set; }
List<IComplex> Children {get;}

Let's say that I am able to pick one of several different types of object that derives from IComplex in design-time and assign it to the controls property "Complex" property.

Naturally I would like to persist this information to the HTML-View in a user-friendly way.

Because we don't know what type the user has picked there is no way to instansiate the type if we don't persist the name of that type. The Type could also contain more properties than the Interface the controls property is refering.

<cc1:MyControl id="MyControl1" runat="server">
<Complex> <!-

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Custom Cultures: Extend Your Code's Global Reach With New Features In The .NET Framework 2.0


The upcoming Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 adds a number of globalization features that address the important issues of extensibility, standards support, and migration. Here authors Michael Kaplan and Cathy Wissink explain what these features mean to your globalization effort.

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ASP.NET 2.0: Personalize Your Portal with User Controls and Custom Web Parts


ASP.NET 2.0 introduces a Web Part control that is designed to deal with the serialization, storage, and retrieval of customization and personalization data behind the scenes. In this article, the authors explain how you can put the WebPart control to work in your ASP.NET 2.0 applications.

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Data Binding: Give Your Everyday Custom Collections a Design-Time Makeover


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DCOM Interop: Generate Custom Managed C++ Wrappers for Easier COM Interoperation Using DCOMSuds


Now that you're writing managed code, you'll certainly want to use your existing COM components, but you can't simply call them directly. Instead, you have to wrap the COM component in a runtime-callable wrapper that acts as a proxy between the component and your managed code. While the CLR provides wrapper classes for this purpose, there will be times when you'll want custom objects to wrap your COM components. One way to get the low-level access you need to precisely control resource cleanup, pass security information, and get access to CLR features is to write your own wrapper class in managed C++. This article shows you how.

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