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Smart Clients: Craft A Rich UI For Your .NET App With Enhanced Windows Forms Support

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

The System.Windows.Forms namespace has increased by approximately 134 percent over the .NET Framework 1.1. There are 446 new public types; 113 existing types have been updated with new members and values; 218 types have been carried over from the original namespace. Read about it here.

Chris Sells and Michael Weinhardt

MSDN Magazine Visual Studio 2005 Guided Tour 2006

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With the much-anticipated release of the .NET Framework 1.1, developers are eager to know what's been added to their programming bag of tricks. In this article, the author focuses on new developments in Windows Forms, such as namespace additions, support for hosting managed controls in unmanaged clients, and designer support for C++ and J#. Integrated access to the Compact Framework and new mobile code security settings also make this release noteworthy. Along with these features, the author reviews the best ways to handle multiple versions of the common language runtime and highlights some potential pitfalls.

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How to programmatically add controls to Windows forms at run time by using Visual C#

Create a Windows Forms Application
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Localizing Windows Forms

The Visual Studio project system provides considerable support for localizing Windows Forms applications. There are two ways to generate resource files using the Visual Studio development environment: one is to have the project system generate the resource files for localizable UI elements such as text and images on the form. The resource files are then built into satellite assemblies. The second way is to add a resource file template and then edit the template with the XML Designer. A reason for doing the latter is to make localizable strings that appear in dialog boxes and error messages. You must then write code to access these resources.

This walkthrough topic demonstrates both processes in a single Windows Application project.

You can also convert a text file to a resource file; for more information, see Resources in Text File Format and Resource File Generator (Resgen.exe).


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