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Class To Contract: Enrich Your XML Serialization With Schema Providers In The .NET Framework

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net
 

The Microsoft .NET Framework 1.x provided minimal options for mapping classes to schemas and serializing objects to XML documents, making this sort of mapping quite a challenge. The .NET Framework 2.0 changes all this with Schema providers and the IXmlSerializable interface.

Keith Pijanowski

MSDN Magazine June 2006




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Hi

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Hi,

I've creating a class called Graphics, deriving from a generic ObservableCollection where T is a custom class called Graphic :

public class Graphics : ObservableCollection<Graphic>
{
public Graphics()
{
}
}

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But I would like to have the following:

<MyOtherClassInstance>
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Please help.

Thanks


Xml Serialization: change tag name of class instances in a generic ObservableCollection / List

  

Hi,

I've creating a class called Graphics, deriving from a generic ObservableCollection where T is a custom class called Graphic :

public class Graphics : ObservableCollection<Graphic>
{
public Graphics()
{
}
}

Another class has a Graphics field. When I serialize to XML this class, this works fine :

<MyOtherClassInstance>
 <Graphics>
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  <Graphic id="2">
  <Graphic id="3">
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</MyOtherClassInstance>

But I would like to have the following:

<MyOtherClassInstance>
 <Gs>
  <Gr id="1">
  <Gr id="2">
  <Gr id="3">
 </Gs>
</MyOtherClassInstance>

How can I process, I can't find a solution.

Please help.

Thanks


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Hi dudes, I have a question:

 

Today I have the following scenario:

 

 [XmlRoot("Etiquetas")]
 public class Etiquetas : List<Etiqueta>
 {

 } 

 public class Etiqueta
 {
 private string _id;
 private string _ptbr;
 private string _enus;

 [XmlAttribute]
 public string id
 {
 get { return _id; }
 set { _id = value; }
 }

 [XmlElement("pt-br")]
 public string pt_br
 {
 get { return _ptbr; }
 set { _ptbr = value; }
 

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