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Service Station: Serialization in Windows Communication Foundation

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

Windows Communication Foundation supports several serialization mechanisms and provides a simple, interoperable foundation for future service-oriented applications. Here Aaron Skonnard explains it all.

Aaron Skonnard

MSDN Magazine August 2006

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Hi all i'will begin to get in WCF Step By Step . please follow me in this case thanks  

The installed version of Windows Communication Foundation does not match the version of the WSAT con


I  got this error after I installed the wsatui.dll for WCF Transaction.

The installed version of Windows Communication Foundation does not match the version of the WSAT configuration tool

anyone who can help me?

Thanks advanced

Frank Xu Lei--????,????
Focus on Distributed Applications Development and EAI based on .NET




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