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SideShow Gadgets: Get Started Writing Gadgets For Windows SideShow Devices

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

SideShow Gadgets for Windows Vista are cool. Writing your own is even better. Find out how it's done.

Jeffrey Richter

MSDN Magazine January 2007

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Before going into too much detail, I would like to point out that you can try the core SharePoint framework (known as Windows SharePoint Services or WSS) for free. On Microsoft's Web site you can download a trial version of Virtual PC 2004 (VPC). Using VPC, you can install the Windows 2003 Evaluation Kit and the WSS add-on. This combination will give you 45 days to evaluate the setup.

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Hi has anyone done anything like this?

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Hi, I have a weird problem.

I can start sql server just fine with services.

But i cannot start sql server with cluster admin utility, nor can i start sql server using command line.

ANd there is no errorlog produced when i tried.  

What could be the problem? below is the cut from the cluster.log file


0000157c.000027bc::2010/10/13-02:50:27.558 INFO SQL Server <SQL Server (US4)>: [sqsrvres] Worker Thread (39E7B90): Calling SQLClusterResourceWorker::WaitForCompletion (200)
0000157c.000027bc::2010/10/13-02:50:27.761 INFO SQL Server <SQL Server (US4)>: [sqsrvres] Worker Thread (39E7B90): Calling SQLClusterResourceWorker::WaitForCompletion (200)
0000157c.000027bc::2010/10/13-02:50:27.964 INFO SQL Server <SQL Server (US4)>: [sqsrvres] Worker Thread (39E7B90): Calling SQLClusterResourceWorker::WaitForCompletion (200)
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