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Windows 7 - WPF - Framework 3.5 - Content not displaying in developer or when running

Posted By:      Posted Date: September 17, 2010    Points: 0   Category :WPF
Help. I seem to have broken WPF 3.5 on my development box.  If I bring up VS2008 and create a new, blank WPF app, it does not display the designer.  If fact, I can see the desktop wallpaper through VS 2008.  If I run the app, I get a window with the same see-through properties.  Plus if I drag the app window around, it leaves artifiacts all over the screen. If I create a new WPF 4.0 app in VS 2010 - no problem.  If I target the app to 3.5 - the designer does not go crazy, but I get the same run-time issue as with VS 2008. Please help! L. Lee SaundersC# developer in a C++ world

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