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Memory Allocation

Posted By:      Posted Date: September 16, 2010    Points: 0   Category :Windows Application
hi friends, i want to ask about memory allocation in visual studio.i confused about like this format(1) for(int i=1;i<10;i++) { var source = dataclass.tableTest.SingleOrDefault(p => p.ID == i) } format(2) var source = dataclass.tableTest.SingleOrDefault(p => p.ID == 0) for(int i=1;i<10;i++) { source = null; source = dataclass.tableTest.SingleOrDefault(p => p.ID == i) } (1)is there any difference between above those two format? (2)variable source will allocate each time on memory in using format(1)? (2)variable source will allocate only once time on memory in using format(2)? i think i should use format(2),is it correct?please guide me. regards Aung

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