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CLR Inside Out: Measure Early and Often for Performance, Part 2

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

In the second of a two-part series, Vance Morrison delves into the meaning of performance measurements, explaining what the numbers mean to you.

Vance Morrison

MSDN Magazine May 2008

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We have just migrated our back end database from Access to MS SQL Server 2008 R2. We have noticed better performance on our searches - unless we select to search in "any part of field" in Access (with Access' built-in search function - we use a mix of Access 2003 and 2007). This takes nearly 20 seconds to find the result, whereas before the migration it was taking 5-7 seconds (compared to instant results we now experience when searching for whole fields). The main fields we search are not large - usually just two words. Obviously it is better to search for a whole or start of a field, but this is not always possible. The contractor that assisted us in this project has told us that this "is just the way SQL works with Access". Is this really true? I find it hard to believe two MS products would have such a big issue between them. I presumed using SQL with an Access front end would be a common setup, which is why I thought this must be a problem with our setup. Is there any way to fix this speed issue?

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We have a SharePoint site. There are a couple of web parts such as content editor web part on the home page.

People with contributor permission can modify the content of the web parts. Once the home checked in or checked in draft mode, the updated content will be showing up on the home page for all users.

Is it possible for those updated content has to be approved before users can view it?

Thanks in advance,



Slow performance calling an Web Service in a Visual Web Part



I'm developing a report from data being served from a web service in SAP (through PI). I used the wsdl.exe to create a c# class and a wrapper and everything is working fine.

The problem is the performance... it takes about 3x the performance of an console application just to move the code inside a Visual Web Part.

I isolated the code to just this... 

DateTime timeReq = DateTime.Now;
response[] t = werbService.method(req);
double timeTaken = DateTime.Now.Subtract(timeReq).TotalMilliseconds;

It takes 60 seconds in a Visual Web Part and the same call in a console application takes 20s.

Since i dont have a packet sniffer i'm not sure why is taking so much time to execute the same code in sharepoint, am i missing some configuration? Anyone have face this kind of behaviour before?


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