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"Oslo" Basics: Build Metadata-Based Applications With The "Oslo" Platform

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

We introduce you to "Oslo" and demonstrate how MSchema and MGraph enable you to build metadata-driven apps. We'll define types and values in "M" and deploy them to the repository.

Chris Sells

MSDN Magazine February 2009

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Show web applications build version information



I would like to make the build information for the running web application but I dont know where I set or configure this nor do I know how to retrieve this information.

In a project you may set the  build information in the file AssemblyInfo.cs under the projects Properties folder. Here is a snippet of the AssemblyInfo.cs file:

// Version information for an assembly consists of the following four values:
//      Major Version
//      Minor Version 
//      Build Number
//      Revision
// You can specify all the values or you can default the Revision and Build Numbers 
// by using the '*' as shown below:
[assembly: AssemblyVersion("6.3.0")]
[assembly: AssemblyFileVersion("6.3.0.*")]

But there is no such file for an web application project, so I have to get this information from one of the compiled DLLs that is in the same assembly as my web application then? Or how is this done?


The reason I want this information is because my customer would like to have a webpage within the web application where he could see the current version. This is also nice to have when testing and debugging etc.




Location-Based Metadata #sp2010plaintalk

This is the first post in a series of SharePoint 2010 plaintalk (#sp2010plaintalk) aimed at SharePoint professionals who are exploring features of the platform, typically to do feasibility assessments for applying platform features in projects. With every new version of the platform I tend to spend a lot of time digging through the marketing and technical content of the new features to understand what a new feature *really* does. We'll start out with a small one on Location-Based Metadata (sounds...(read more)
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