.NET Tutorials, Forums, Interview Questions And Answers
Welcome :Guest
Sign In
Win Surprise Gifts!!!

Top 5 Contributors of the Month
Gaurav Pal
Post New Web Links

Best Practice: An Introduction To Domain-Driven Design

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net

We give you a gentle introduction to designing and evolving rich domain models as part of integrating Domain-Driven Design (DDD) into your coding efforts.

David Laribee

MSDN Magazine February 2009

View Complete Post

More Related Resource Links

Patterns in Practice: Internal Domain Specific Languages


Jeremy Miller explains how internal Domain Specific Languages can help you craft code that is easier to read and write. His bag of tricks to improve your programming includes extension methods, fluent interfaces, object extensions and use of the semantic model.

Jeremy Miller

MSDN Magazine January 2010

Usability in Practice: The Tao of Screen Design


This article describes methods for designing screens in a user interface and the technology frameworks that support screen design.

Ambrose Little, Charles B. Kreitzberg

MSDN Magazine September 2009

Patterns in Practice: Incremental Delivery Through Continuous Design


The end goal of software projects is to deliver value to the customer. Software design is a major factor in how successfully a team can deliver that value. The best designs are a product of continuous design rather than the result of an effort that tries to get the entire design right up front. This approach lets you strive to apply lessons learned from the project to continuously improve the design, instead of becoming locked into an erroneous design developed too early in the project.

Jeremy Miller

MSDN Magazine August 2009

Test-Driven Design: Using Mocks And Tests To Design Role-Based Objects


Use Test-Driven Development with mock objects to design object oriented code in terms of roles and responsibilities, not categorization of objects into class hierarchies.

Isaiah Perumalla

MSDN Magazine June 2009

Patterns in Practice: Design For Testability


Designing testability into your app means smaller tests that are cheaper to create, easier to understand, faster to run, and much simpler to debug.

Jeremy Miller

MSDN Magazine December 2008

Test-Driven C#: Improve the Design and Flexibility of Your Project with Extreme Programming Techniqu


Test-driven development (TDD) should be on every developer's radar screen because a comprehensive set of tests makes for maintainable code and frees you from having to create a perfect design up-front. This article explains how to perform TDD and takes you step-by-step through a number examples to get you started.

Will Stott and James Newkirk

MSDN Magazine April 2004

Measures for Additive vs Non-Additive Data. What is cube design best practice?


I'm looking more for SSAS 2008 best practice design advice, rather than for an answer to a specific question (although I have a specifc set of examples).

First issue:  Creating a non-additive measure group and an additive measure group.  We have some fact data in our current cube that is additive, and some fact data that is non-additive; all stored in the same fact table.  We do not currently have measures implemented that reflect this aggregation distinction.  Question:  Is it considered good practice to segregate additive and non-additive fact data into a) different fact tables and/or b) different measure groups?  My thought is that it would be an acceptable design approach, but am looking for feedback.

Second issue:  Non-additive fact data is only available at a non-leaf grain.  The example here is that we have non-additive fact data which is only available for the 4th or 5th levels of our 6-level geography dimension.  Our solution has been to create a custom geography branch, which now essentially serves as our 'aggregation treatment' for non-additive fact data.  I don't believe it's a good practice to have the geography dimension serve this function because we end up having to create a custom geo member for each non-additive fact data element.  Question:  What is considered best practice

Contoso Karate - Data Driven User Interface Widgets in an ASP.NET MVC 3 Design

In the previous post in this Contoso Karate MVC Series we re-factored our LogIn control widget into a PartialView. We did this for a few reasons. Views want to be associated with only one model and we want to reserve that model for one that is more central to the particular page being displayed. (Specifying the Model for the view [...] Read More......(read more)

Abstract Factory Design in C# , Vb.NET

Provide an interface for creating families of related or dependent objects without specifying their concrete classes

Prototype Design Pattern in C#. Vb.NET

Specify the kind of objects to create using a prototypical instance, and create new objects by copying this prototype

Adapter Design Pattern in C#, VB.NET

Convert the interface of a class into another interface clients expect. Adapter lets classes work together that couldn't otherwise because of incompatible interfaces.

Singleton Design Pattern in C#, Vb.NET

Ensure a class has only one instance and provide a global point of access to it.

Introduction to Functions

A function is a section of code that is used to perform an isolated assignment. Once it has performed its assignment, the function can be accessed to present its result(s).

In Transact-SQL, a function is considered an object. After creating the function object, it becomes part of a database. You can then execute it when necessary.

Multi-threading in .NET: Introduction and suggestions

This article uses the C# type shorthands throughout - int for Int32 etc. I hope this makes it easier for C# developers to read, and won't impede any other developers too much. It also only talks about the C# ways of declaring variables to be volatile and locking monitors. Developers using other languages can find the equivalents in their own preferred environment, I'm sure.

Solidify Your C# Application Architecture with Design Patterns

design pattern can solve many problems by providing a framework for building an application. Design patterns, which make the design process cleaner and more efficient, are especially well-suited for use in C# development because it is an object-oriented language. Existing design patterns make good templates for your objects, allowing you to build software faster. This article describes several popular design patterns you can use in your own applications, including the singleton, the decorator, the composite, and the state classes, which can improve the extensibility of your applications and the reuse of your objects.

What Are Design Patterns and Do I Need Them?

Software professionals may be familiar with the term "Design Patterns," but many have no idea of where they come from and what they truly are. Consequently, some do not see the value and benefits design patterns bring to the software development process, especially in the areas of maintenance and code reuse.

Design Patterns for .NET

It is not the intent of the Design Pattern Series to focus on providing a theoretical knowledge dump of all there is to know about design patterns. There are many books that do that already. Instead, this series will focus on providing lots of practical examples. However, there will be some theory to help address important points concerning design patterns. I use the theory of design patterns mostly as a guide and instead make references to good design pattern books for more detail explanation.
ASP.NetWindows Application  .NET Framework  C#  VB.Net  ADO.Net  
Sql Server  SharePoint  Silverlight  Others  All   

Hall of Fame    Twitter   Terms of Service    Privacy Policy    Contact Us    Archives   Tell A Friend